Death in Danzig

Death in Danzig❰Reading❯ ➷ Death in Danzig Author Stefan Chwin – Heartforum.co.uk Germans flee the besieged city of Danzig in Poles driven out of eastern regions controlled by the Russians move into the homes hastily abandoned by their previous inhabitants In an area of the city g Germans flee the besieged city of Danzig inPoles driven out of eastern regions controlled by the Russians move into the homes hastily abandoned by their previous inhabitants In an area of the city graced with beech trees and a stately cathedral, the stories of old and new residents intertwine Hanemann, a German and a former professor of anatomy, who chooses to stay in Danzig after the mysterious death of his lover the Polish family of the narrator, driven out of Warsaw and a young Death in PDF \ Carpathian woman who no longer has a country, her cheerful nature concealing deep woundsThrough his brilliantly defined characters, stunning evocation of place, and memorable descriptions of a world that was German but survives in Polish households, Chwin has created a reality that is beyond destruction.

Polish novelist, literary critic, and historian of literature whose life and literary work is closely linked to his hometown Gda sk He holds a post of Literature Professor at the University of Gda sk, his professional interests are focused on romanticismThe most well known novel by Stefan Chwin is entitled Hanemann It has been translated into German, Swedish, Spanish and English the plot of the novel is set in Danzig in the wake of World War IIIn he received the Erich Brost Death in PDF \ Danzig Award for his merits on Polish German reconciliation.

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  • Hardcover
  • 272 pages
  • Death in Danzig
  • Stefan Chwin
  • English
  • 13 July 2019
  • 0151008051

10 thoughts on “Death in Danzig

  1. Laurie says:

    Until this novel I have never intentionally read a book slower than I had wished just to savor the language and postpone the inevitable finish Death in Danzig is less concerned with plot and character though the characters are finely drawn than it is with creating images in the mind of the reader of the life of the city of Gdansk, Poland as it transitions from its old German centered life as Danzig after WW II I felt as though I was reading an impressionistic painting Sadly at this time is Until this novel I have never intentionally read a book slower than I had wished just to savor the language and postpone the inevitable finish Death in Danzig is less concerned with plot and character though the characters are finely drawn than it is with creating images in the mind of the reader of the life of the city of Gdansk, Poland as it transitions from its old German centered life as Danzig after WW II I felt as though I was reading an impressionistic painting Sadly at this time is is the author s only book translated into English

  2. Marian says:

    This book s tone reminds me of Sebald, although there is an actual story line I find these quiet, cerebral Western European I know, it s Polish, but the aesthetic is WE intriguing if well done They make me all thecognizant of how far Russia is from Europe because I can t imagine a Russian producing anything with a similar tone.Danzig Gdansk is, of course, a special place historically, and the book is premised on this passing from hand to hand that went on the plot comes directly out o This book s tone reminds me of Sebald, although there is an actual story line I find these quiet, cerebral Western European I know, it s Polish, but the aesthetic is WE intriguing if well done They make me all thecognizant of how far Russia is from Europe because I can t imagine a Russian producing anything with a similar tone.Danzig Gdansk is, of course, a special place historically, and the book is premised on this passing from hand to hand that went on the plot comes directly out of the clash among nations that was played out there I found it engrossing, particularly as I fell into the rhythm, a success I have to give the translator, Philip Boehm,than a little credit for

  3. Gayane says:

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  4. Judy says:

    I started this book when we were traveling in Gdansk, the Polish version of Danzig, which was a German city until the end of the World War II At that time, the Germans were forcefully driven out of the city, many being killed in the process, and Poles who had been exiled or imprisoned in Russia moved into their homes This novel tells the story of this transition through various characters viewpoints a German doctor who discovers his lover s body on his autopsy table in the first chapter of t I started this book when we were traveling in Gdansk, the Polish version of Danzig, which was a German city until the end of the World War II At that time, the Germans were forcefully driven out of the city, many being killed in the process, and Poles who had been exiled or imprisoned in Russia moved into their homes This novel tells the story of this transition through various characters viewpoints a German doctor who discovers his lover s body on his autopsy table in the first chapter of the book, a Polish family driven out of Warsaw who come to settle in Danzig, and a young Carpathian woman This is a wonderful book to read for anyone who wants to understand the complex city that is now Gdansk

  5. Terry Pitts says:

    The unnamed narrator was but a unborn child in his mother s womb when his Polish family had to flee war torn Warsaw and settle in part of an abandoned house they appropriated in what had been the German city of Danzig The rest of the house is occupied by a quiet German anatomy professor who refused to flee when the Russians took control of the region in 1945 As the narrator grows up, he becomes obsessed with finding out about the prior life of the professor, and in doing so he tells a story of The unnamed narrator was but a unborn child in his mother s womb when his Polish family had to flee war torn Warsaw and settle in part of an abandoned house they appropriated in what had been the German city of Danzig The rest of the house is occupied by a quiet German anatomy professor who refused to flee when the Russians took control of the region in 1945 As the narrator grows up, he becomes obsessed with finding out about the prior life of the professor, and in doing so he tells a story of lives disrupted by war, of successive waves of people fleeing armies, of love and fear, and of the period of Sovietization of Poland shortly after WWII A subtle but powerful book

  6. Jakub Balawejder says:

    Cudowna, magiczna

  7. Martinxo says:

    I really, really wanted to like this book but it left me cold Maybe I ll come back to it again one day.

  8. WndyJW says:

    I wanted to know what a great European city felt like during WWII and this book almost perfectly captures Danzig in 1945 Through Chwin s intelligent prose we see a graceful, beautiful, ancient port city undergoing a violent transformation The German Danzig was a city with nicely appointed apartments on pretty streets, after bombing and raids by Russian soldiers it becomes the Polish Gdansk The timeless beauty remains even though the names of the streets change and the new and remaining citize I wanted to know what a great European city felt like during WWII and this book almost perfectly captures Danzig in 1945 Through Chwin s intelligent prose we see a graceful, beautiful, ancient port city undergoing a violent transformation The German Danzig was a city with nicely appointed apartments on pretty streets, after bombing and raids by Russian soldiers it becomes the Polish Gdansk The timeless beauty remains even though the names of the streets change and the new and remaining citizens are traumatized.This is not a story about people who survive the war as much as it a story about a city surving a war as told through characters and things And the things They went about their usual business, watching from the shelves and etageres, windowsills and countertops, indifferent to our concerns, refusing to take sides, patiently yielding to our waiting hands, either to fit like a glove or slip through our fingers and fall with a shriek onto the concrete tiles Only then did they jolt us into awareness, in the flash of shattering poreclain, the clatter of silver, the splintering of glass In actuality they were invisible, because who ever paid any attention to the color of air, light trapped in glass, the song of drawers pulled open, or the high pitched notes of mahogany armoire

  9. Antonia says:

    The book is very interesting as far as cultural memory, imagology, and identity are concerned However, you need to be very familiar with Polish history to get most of what is going on, especially since the book is intentionally written in a vague style Modernist novels and I don t usually get along.

  10. Barbara says:

    haunting, very real characters Brings to life the invasion of Poland by Nazis and Soviets and life under suspicion.

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