Latino Social Movements: Historical and Theoretical Perspectives

Latino Social Movements: Historical and Theoretical Perspectives[PDF] ✎ Latino Social Movements: Historical and Theoretical Perspectives By Rodolfo D. Torres – Heartforum.co.uk First Published in Routledge is an imprint of Taylor Francis, an informa company First Published inRoutledge is an imprint of Movements: Historical PDF Å Taylor Francis, an informa company.

Is a well known author, some of Movements: Historical PDF Å his books are a fascination for readers like in the Latino Social Movements: Latino Social PDF \ Historical and Theoretical Perspectives book, this is one of the most wanted Rodolfo D Torres author readers around the world.

Latino Social Movements: Historical and Theoretical
  • Paperback
  • 216 pages
  • Latino Social Movements: Historical and Theoretical Perspectives
  • Rodolfo D. Torres
  • English
  • 04 January 2017
  • 0415922992

10 thoughts on “Latino Social Movements: Historical and Theoretical Perspectives

  1. James says:

    In this collection of essays on Latino social movements, the authors seek to put an emphasis on class politics, community development, patriarchy and capitol Chapter subjects include several subjects on a variety of the wide reaching Latino a identity The first explores Chicana feminist writers The second looks to the NYC Puerto Rican self determination movement through the East Harlem Real Great Society Urban Planning Studio, which opposed displacement and argued for greater ownership fo t In this collection of essays on Latino social movements, the authors seek to put an emphasis on class politics, community development, patriarchy and capitol Chapter subjects include several subjects on a variety of the wide reaching Latino a identity The first explores Chicana feminist writers The second looks to the NYC Puerto Rican self determination movement through the East Harlem Real Great Society Urban Planning Studio, which opposed displacement and argued for greater ownership fo the community by Puerto Ricans Chapter three moves to the Puerto Rican socialist movement in California, which helped build demands for independence but was hampered by rigid Stalinism Chapter four moves to the 1933 Los Angeles farmworker strike, in which the Mexican government encouraged conservative union movement to displace radical militants, through the Mexicanismo ideology Chapter five looks to the Los Angeles garment industry where sweatshop labor was and is regularly used, paying mostly immigrant Mexican workers below minimum wage Given the book s publication 1999, the author calls for unionization to help protect garment workers, as Latinos made up 43% of Los Angeles population at the time of publication yet only 15% of the electorate Chapter six examines the future of Latino politics as the anxieties of demographic shifts in the United States mean potential racialization and permanent underclass of brown citizens though I believe some of the racial understandings of the Latino identity have shifted since its publication Finally, the La Raza Unida Party of the 1960s is examined, which, though shortlived, was long remembered for paving paths for Latino self determination because of its radical call for secession of a part of the Southwest to reclaim an area lost because of the illegal 1848 conquest Key Themes and Concept Book focuses on larger social identity and complicated structures within, resisting the univerisalizing experience of Latinoness

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