Forgotten Time: The Yazoo-Mississippi Delta After the Civil War

Forgotten Time: The Yazoo-Mississippi Delta After the Civil War[PDF] ✩ Forgotten Time: The Yazoo-Mississippi Delta After the Civil War By John C. Willis – Heartforum.co.uk Although it came to epitomize the Cotton South in the twentieth century, the Yazoo Mississippi Delta emerged as a distinct entity in the decades following the Civil War As other southerners confronted The Yazoo-Mississippi ePUB ↠ Although it came to epitomize the Cotton South in the twentieth century, the Yazoo Mississippi Delta emerged as a distinct entity in the decades following the Civil War As other southerners confronted the need to rebuild, the Delta remained mostly wilderness inElsewhere, planters struggled to maintain the perquisites of slaveholding and poor families tried desperately to escape the sharecropper s lot, yet Delta landlords offered generous terms to freed people willing to clear and cultivate backcountry acres subject to yellow fever and yearly Forgotten Time: ePUB × flooding By the turn of the century, two thirds of the region s farmers were African Americans, whose holdings represented great political and economic strengthMost historical studies of the Delta have either lauded the achievements of its white planters or found its record number of lynchings representative of the worst aspects of the New South By looking beyond white planters to the region as a whole, John C Willis uncovers surprising evidence of African American enterprise, the advantages of tenancy in an unstable cotton Time: The Yazoo-Mississippi PDF ✓ market, and the dominance of foreign born merchants in the area, including many Chinese Examining the lives of individuals freedmen, planters, and merchants Willis explores the reciprocal interests of former slaves and former slaveholders He shows how, in a cruel irony replicated in other areas of the South, the backbreaking work that African Americans did to clear, settle, and farm the land away from the river made the land ultimately too valuable for them to retain By the beginning of the twentieth century, the Delta began to devolve back into a stereotypical southern region with African Americans cast back into an impoverished, debt ridden labor systemThe Yazoo Mississippi Delta has long been seen as a focal point for the study of Reconstruction, and Forgotten Time enters this historiographical tradition at the same time that it reverses many of its central assumptions.

The Yazoo-Mississippi ePUB ↠ Is a well known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the Forgotten Time: The Yazoo Mississippi Delta After the Civil War book, this is one of the most wanted John C Willis author readers around the world.

Forgotten Time: The Yazoo-Mississippi Delta After the
    Import EPUB to the Program Import EPUB rebuild, the Delta remained mostly wilderness inElsewhere, planters struggled to maintain the perquisites of slaveholding and poor families tried desperately to escape the sharecropper s lot, yet Delta landlords offered generous terms to freed people willing to clear and cultivate backcountry acres subject to yellow fever and yearly Forgotten Time: ePUB × flooding By the turn of the century, two thirds of the region s farmers were African Americans, whose holdings represented great political and economic strengthMost historical studies of the Delta have either lauded the achievements of its white planters or found its record number of lynchings representative of the worst aspects of the New South By looking beyond white planters to the region as a whole, John C Willis uncovers surprising evidence of African American enterprise, the advantages of tenancy in an unstable cotton Time: The Yazoo-Mississippi PDF ✓ market, and the dominance of foreign born merchants in the area, including many Chinese Examining the lives of individuals freedmen, planters, and merchants Willis explores the reciprocal interests of former slaves and former slaveholders He shows how, in a cruel irony replicated in other areas of the South, the backbreaking work that African Americans did to clear, settle, and farm the land away from the river made the land ultimately too valuable for them to retain By the beginning of the twentieth century, the Delta began to devolve back into a stereotypical southern region with African Americans cast back into an impoverished, debt ridden labor systemThe Yazoo Mississippi Delta has long been seen as a focal point for the study of Reconstruction, and Forgotten Time enters this historiographical tradition at the same time that it reverses many of its central assumptions."/>
  • Paperback
  • 239 pages
  • Forgotten Time: The Yazoo-Mississippi Delta After the Civil War
  • John C. Willis
  • English
  • 13 November 2019
  • 0813919827

10 thoughts on “Forgotten Time: The Yazoo-Mississippi Delta After the Civil War

  1. Arthur Ownby says:

    Forgotten Time stands as a comprehensive and well researched exploration of the discrete political and socio economic factors that shaped the Yazoo Mississippi Delta following the Civil War.

  2. Allan says:

    Concerning the area between the Yazoo and Mississippi rivers which tellingly came to be referred to as Mississippi s Mississippi Willis describes the post Civil War fate of a place that for a brief time became a promised land for freed men, but which ultimately embodied the cancerous legacy of chattel slavery.The Yazoo Mississippi Delta in 1865 was yet largely a wilderness of original forest, which made it unattractive for cultivation, despite the richness of the soil This meant that land was Concerning the area between the Yazoo and Mississippi rivers which tellingly came to be referred to as Mississippi s Mississippi Willis describes the post Civil War fate of a place that for a brief time became a promised land for freed men, but which ultimately embodied the cancerous legacy of chattel slavery.The Yazoo Mississippi Delta in 1865 was yet largely a wilderness of original forest, which made it unattractive for cultivation, despite the richness of the soil This meant that land was available at prices affordable for men of slender means who were willing to clear trees and to perform the necessary work to raise cotton For many former slaves this presented a golden opportunity, and settlement began As the value of timber and ultimately the cotton produce of these fertile bottom lands became apparent, various attempts were made to run rail lines through the Delta to facilitate the transportation of its products.After two decades of relative success and prosperity, unfortunately, the price of cotton sank to levels which made it impossible to turn any profit on its production By the turn of the Century, debt was the norm, and very few freeholders were out of its grip From this situation, rebounding prices after 1900 meant that surging property values put land ownership beyond the reach of those who formerly held lands, and the end of Reconstruction and rebounding of white supremacist attitudes delivered former freemen in the Delta into sharecropping, aka slavery lite.How does this story continue See histories of Jim Crow and the Great Migration, such as Isabel Wilkerson s The Warmth of Other Suns

  3. Walt says:

    Covering Reconstruction for this small area of the former Confederacy, Willis has done an excellent job demonstrating how the 20% minority white population managed to dominate the 80% freedmen population Willis style is not as dry as many academicians He includes some anecdotal stories and humor does appear once in a while It is an easy book to go through He did a masterful job synthesizing a great deal of data and research into this book The only issue I really have with the book is that Covering Reconstruction for this small area of the former Confederacy, Willis has done an excellent job demonstrating how the 20% minority white population managed to dominate the 80% freedmen population Willis style is not as dry as many academicians He includes some anecdotal stories and humor does appear once in a while It is an easy book to go through He did a masterful job synthesizing a great deal of data and research into this book The only issue I really have with the book is that Willis does not set the book in context relative to other locations In a few isolated places he says that circumstances in the Yazoo Delta were unique when compared to the rest of the Old South However, readers are left to assume that the story he presents here is applicable everywhere else in the region Overall, interesting, entertaining, and informative Willis avoids proselytizing and decrying injustice In a few places the white planter class do appear as boogey men, but these areas are few and far between Willis maintains that the greatest threat to the freedmen after Emancipation was economics, not intimidation or education The price of cotton continued to fall and that,than anything else, hurt the new freedmen farmers Of course, the declining price of cotton also hurt the planters, who allowedopportunities Once cotton prices were back up, the planters used many tricks to re assert themselves

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