The Chosen

The Chosen❮Ebook❯ ➨ The Chosen ➩ Author Chaim Potok – Heartforum.co.uk It is the now classic story of two fathers and two sons and the pressures on all of them to pursue the religion they share in the way that is best suited to each And as the boys grow into young men, t It is the now classic story of two fathers and two sons and the pressures on all of them to pursue the religion they share in the way that is best suited to each And as the boys grow into young men, they discover in the other a lost spiritual brother, and a link to an unexplored world that neither had ever considered before In effect, they exchange places, and find the peace that neither will ever retreat from again.

Herman Harold Potok, or Chaim Tzvi, was born in Buffalo, New York, to Polish immigrants He received an Orthodox Jewish education After reading Evelyn Waugh s novel Brideshead Revisited as a teenager, he decided to become a writer He started writing fiction at the age of At age he made his first submission to the magazine The Atlantic Monthly Although it wasn t published, he received a note from the editor complimenting his workIn , at the age of , his stories were published in the literary magazine of Yeshiva University, which he also helped edit In , Potok graduated summa cum laude with a BA in English LiteratureAfter four years of study at the Jewish Theological Seminary of America he was ordained as a Conservative rabbi He was appointed director of Leaders Training Fellowship, a youth organization affiliated with Conservative JudaismAfter receiving a master s degree in English literature, Potok enlisted with the US Army as a chaplain He served in South Korea from to He described his time in S Korea as a transformative experience Brought up to believe that the Jewish people were central to history and God s plans, he experienced a region where there were almost no Jews and no anti Semitism, yet whose religious believers prayed with the same fervor that he saw in Orthodox synagogues at homeUpon his return, he joined the faculty of the University of Judaism in Los Angeles and became the director of a Conservative Jewish summer camp affiliated with the Conservative movement, Camp Ramah A year later he began his graduate studies at the University of Pennsylvania and was appointed scholar in residence at Temple Har Zion in PhiladelphiaIn , he spent a year in Israel, where he wrote his doctoral dissertation on Solomon Maimon and began to write a novelIn Potok moved to Brooklyn He became the managing editor of the magazine Conservative Judaism and joined the faculty of the Teachers Institute of the Jewish Theological Seminary The following year, he was appointed editor in chief of the Jewish Publication Society in Philadelphia and later, chairman of the publication committee Potok received a doctorate in philosophy from the University of PennsylvaniaIn , Potok relocated to Jerusalem with his family He returned to Philadelphia in After the publication of Old Men at Midnight, he was diagnosed with brain cancer He died at his home in Merion, Pennsylvania on July , , aged .

Mass Market Paperback  ´ The Chosen PDF/EPUB Ä
  • Mass Market Paperback
  • 304 pages
  • The Chosen
  • Chaim Potok
  • English
  • 14 December 2018
  • 0449213447

10 thoughts on “The Chosen

  1. Jim Fonseca says:

    The book jacket tells us that this was the first book published 1967 that introduced Jewish culture to a wide American audience.The story centers around two boys growing up in the Jewish neighborhood of Williamsburg in Brooklyn in New York City of the 1940 s The main character is a high school aged boy who lost his mother years ago and is raised by his father, a teacher at a Jewish school, and a housekeeper They are devout Orthodox Jews.Due to a baseball injury, he makes friends with another The book jacket tells us that this was the first book published 1967 that introduced Jewish culture to a wide American audience.The story centers around two boys growing up in the Jewish neighborhood of Williamsburg in Brooklyn in New York City of the 1940 s The main character is a high school aged boy who lost his mother years ago and is raised by his father, a teacher at a Jewish school, and a housekeeper They are devout Orthodox Jews.Due to a baseball injury, he makes friends with another devout Jewish boy who is a Hasidic Jew, destined to inherit his father s position as a rebbe tzaddik The boy is so exceptional the main character s father says he has a mind that is seen once in a generation that the father encourages him to befriend the boy Both boys are exceptional scholars In addition to going to school from 6 am to 6 pm and then coming home to do hours of homework they manage to read 3 or 4 books of outside reading each week The Hasidic rebbe raises his son in silence never talking to him outside the context of Torah lessons We follow the two boys through various troubles World War II enters into the story As the boy recovers from his sports injury to his eye in the hospital, he listens to radio news about the D Day landing The war ends in 1945, news of the horrors of the Holocaust is absorbed by the community, and shortly after 1947 Israel is founded The main character s father becomes a fund raiser and a political advocate supporting the establishment of the Jewish state This causes a rift between the boys because some members of the Hassidic community thought it was blasphemy to re establish Israel prior to the coming of the Messiah Interspersed with the plot, the book gives us details of other differences between Orthodox Jews and Hasidic Jews The latter culture grew out of the Eastern European Jewish tradition Ashkenazi after the mass atrocities committed by Cossacks against the Jews, known as the Chmielnicki uprising This took place in Poland in the 1600 s The community was so devastated 100,000 killed that its faith was impacted False messiahs and mysticism appeared which generated the Kabballah Non sensical scholarship pilpul, which reminds me of how many angels on the head of a pin in the Christian tradition was pursued by some The tzaddiks evolved rebbes of inherited position who are so revered that their followers want to touch them Another permutation of the faith was gematria assigning numerical values to letters and words in the Torah and searching for multiple meanings through what outsiders would call numerology.We follow the boys as they mature, and they don t necessarily fall into the paths expected of them This is a good read The author does a good job of interspersing the cultural and historical details into the narrative so that it remains a novel, not a sociological text I should add that many of the words I ve used in this review have alternate spellings from those used in the edition I read photo of Chasidim in Williamsburg from vosizneias.com

  2. Mads says:

    This was required reading for my sopho year honors English class upon reading chapter one, I prepared myself for great disappointment, firstly because the chapter was entirely about baseball which although I ve tried to enjoy I can t seem to get in to, I m sorry to say , and secondly because it was so descriptive It was hard to imagine me being interested in something soflowery in some time I ll post a review on another required reading, the oh so detailed Great Expectations, which ha This was required reading for my sopho year honors English class upon reading chapter one, I prepared myself for great disappointment, firstly because the chapter was entirely about baseball which although I ve tried to enjoy I can t seem to get in to, I m sorry to say , and secondly because it was so descriptive It was hard to imagine me being interested in something soflowery in some time I ll post a review on another required reading, the oh so detailed Great Expectations, which hasn t improved for me even through chapter thirty six.Coming into the later chapters of The Chosen, I began to enjoy it a lotNot only was the storyline interesting and the characters likable, but its deeper meaning was insightful and reminded me of the events happening in the U S concerning Jews and the Holocaust about Mr Malter rallying for a Jewish state, about Reb Saunders opposing this movement, and most prominently sticking out in my mind, the quote from the Hasidic boy who told Reuven that Hitler destroyed the Jewish body, but you destroy the Jewish soul paraphrased It gave me a certain perspective that makes me regret not having read the book sooner.This is one of those books that I love, but can t really explain why With Dune it s easy great story, great characters, it s got everything I ve ever asked for With Harry Potter, it s got great people, great creatures, great symbolism With The Hobbit it gives you a fun story and lovable characters But, like The Chosen, books like The Invisible Man, 1984, and Fahrenheit 451 all leave me mind boggled I love those books They make me think They make me wonder It s like the brief, fleeting moment in Algebra when you realize that you ve got it and it s all clicking into place there are no words to describe how you feel when you realize, Hey, I understand what the author means by this, I see it s deeper meaning all just before the feeling goes and you re left paralyzed by the knowledge that you ve understood what it s all about, even if you don t understand it now quite as completely as in that moment, but instead of the movement of clicking into place it s like you ve understood it all along With these kinds of books, there s a supernatural element to them that entirely surpasses other novels, and your literary understanding is taken to new levels and into new lights.These are the kinds of books I want to be reading for the rest of my life.The Chosen is one of those booksand as much as I m disliking Dickens at the moment, I m glad I had that bit of required reading

  3. Greta G says:

    This is a man s worldBut it wouldn t be nothing, nothing, not one little thing, without a woman or a girlHe s lost in the wildernessHe s lost in bitterness, he s lost lostJames Brown, of course This must have been one of the most solemn books I ve ever read It s a poignant story about two teenagers, Reuven and Danny, who grow up in Jewish Orthodox families in Brooklyn, during the period between the end of the second world war and the creation of Israel Reuven is a Modern Orthodox Jew, and hThis is a man s worldBut it wouldn t be nothing, nothing, not one little thing, without a woman or a girlHe s lost in the wildernessHe s lost in bitterness, he s lost lostJames Brown, of course This must have been one of the most solemn books I ve ever read It s a poignant story about two teenagers, Reuven and Danny, who grow up in Jewish Orthodox families in Brooklyn, during the period between the end of the second world war and the creation of Israel Reuven is a Modern Orthodox Jew, and his friend Danny is raised in a Hasidic family The author explores their friendship, the relationships with their fathers, and the struggle between faith and secularity Modern Orthodox and Hasidic beliefs These boys lives seem to revolve around the study of the Talmud and orthodox scholarship, and there are extensive passages about it in the book To my surprise, I quite enjoyed reading this as it immersed me in a world of logical reasoning and critical thinking, which to me have always seemed incompatible with the study of any religious texts, without losing your faith Zionism is also a theme the book touches upon, in particular the radically different views within the Jewish communities The story is told in a rather straightforward style, and has a sad tone throughout I believe it were this tone and writing style that prevented me from really loving the book, although it s not always clear why I liked a book, but didn t love it The book immerses the reader not only in a fundamentalist atmosphere, but also in a man s world, in which women are almost totally absent This book at least offers women a glimpse in these men s peculiar worldYou ought to get yourself a girl, it s a wonderful tonic for a suffering soul This was by far the best advice Reuven gave to his friend Danny 7 10

  4. Alisa says:

    Danny Saunders was raised in silence to save his soul His father saw that his mind was so keen that his soul would be lost if there was not some awful tragedy to break his soul into a living space So his father raised him in silence, never speaking to him until Danny learned to listen to that silence, to hear in the silence the cry of millions of his people as they were slaughtered, starved, beaten, and experimented upon by Hilter s army It did not make Danny a rabbi, but it saved his soul in Danny Saunders was raised in silence to save his soul His father saw that his mind was so keen that his soul would be lost if there was not some awful tragedy to break his soul into a living space So his father raised him in silence, never speaking to him until Danny learned to listen to that silence, to hear in the silence the cry of millions of his people as they were slaughtered, starved, beaten, and experimented upon by Hilter s army It did not make Danny a rabbi, but it saved his soul in the end It gave him the ears of a psychologist as he could listen to that silence As I read this, I kept thinking about how God has raised us in silence We are only allowed communication with him in certain ways, through rituals, through scripture All else is silence In this silence, we long for a closer relationship We suffer We hold respect for God and the methods used for communication And in that silence, we hear the suffering of the world, of each child that dies every five seconds of hunger We hear that silence, and, I hope, it gives us a heart

  5. Katie Hanna says:

    I m 23 years old and I ve been reading for most of the time I ve been alive In all those years of reading, I can recall openly sobbing on only two occasions The first time was in Little Women, when Beth March died And the second time was in The Chosen, when Reb Saunders said this In the silence between us, he began to hear the world crying.

  6. Radhika says:

    i was litterally gnna shoot myself when reading this boook i couldnt evn stand it so i decided to buy the audio version on itunes and that was even worse and cost me like 20 dolllaa i wass like heyllll nawww im not reading dissss but den i did cuzz i kinda had too its about a jewish nerd who gets hit in the eye when the rivalryy jewish team hits him they dont like eachother or something i dont know it was all downhill from there ysaaaaa heardd

  7. Poiema says:

    The Jewish Talmud exhorts a man to do two things for himself First, acquire a teacher The other is to choose a friend.Danny Saunders got the package deal when he made the acquaintance of Reuven Malter Theirs is a Jonathan and David friendship, the two bodies with one soul type of friendship that happens rarely in a lifetime.As the oldest son of the tzaddik righteous leader of a strict, Hasidic Jewish sect, Danny is the chosen Upon the death of his father, he will be expected to step up as The Jewish Talmud exhorts a man to do two things for himself First, acquire a teacher The other is to choose a friend.Danny Saunders got the package deal when he made the acquaintance of Reuven Malter Theirs is a Jonathan and David friendship, the two bodies with one soul type of friendship that happens rarely in a lifetime.As the oldest son of the tzaddik righteous leader of a strict, Hasidic Jewish sect, Danny is the chosen Upon the death of his father, he will be expected to step up as head of the dynasty Thus his father, the brilliant but eccentric Reb Saunders, focuses his full attention upon the proper upbringing of his son.But what is a proper upbringing for a genius Listen to the agonizing dilemma of Danny s father A man is born into this world with only a tiny spark of goodness in him The spark is God, it is the soul the rest is ugliness and evil, a shell The spark must be guarded like a treasure, it must be nurtured, it must be fanned into flame Snip Anything can be a shell.anything Indifference, laziness, brutality, and genius Yes, even a great mind can be a shell and choke the spark Reuven, the Master of the Universe blessed me with a brilliant son And he cursed me with all the problems of raising him Ah, what it is to have a brilliant son Not a smart son, Reuven, but a brilliant son, a Daniel, a boy with a mind like a jewel Ah, what a curse it is, what an anguish it is to have a Daniel, whose mind is like a pearl, like a sun Reuven, when my Daniel was four years old, I saw him reading a story from a book And I was frightened he did not read the story, he swallowed it, as one swallows food or water There was no soul in my four year old Daniel, there was only his mind He was a mind in a body without a soul It was a story in a Yiddish book about a poor Jew and his struggles to get to Eretz Yisroel before he died Ah, how that man suffered And my Daniel enjoyed the story, he enjoyed the last terrible page, because when he finished it he realized for the first time what a memory he had He looked at me proudly and told me back the story from memory, and I cried inside my heart I went away and cried to the Master of the Universe, What have you done to me A mind like this I need for a son A heart I need for a son, a soul I need for a son, compassion I want from my son, righteousness, mercy, strength to suffer and carry pain, that I want from my son, not a mind without a soul Reb Saunders makes a very unusual choice for his son He chooses to raise him in silence Except for weekly dialogue over the Talmud and Torah, no words pass between father and son Though it seems cruel, it is the father s best hope that the suffering it creates will fan into flame that spark of a soul that lies within Danny.Reuven becomes the counter balance for Danny s relationship with his father As aliberal Jew, Reuven is able to bring a rational element into an otherwise emotionally volatile situation Without their friendship, it is easy to see that Danny would crumple either from rage or simply from the heavy load of expectation he carries as a burden.Ultimately, Reb Saunders can claim at least partial victory for his son s upbringing Danny will break the the multi generational traditions of his ancestors he will not step into the chosen role of Tzaddik Rather, he will be a tzaddik for the world , a different kind of a healer in his chosen field of psychology But he will remain a practicing Jew, a man with a soul in whom the spark of life burns brightly.I loved this book It was fascinating to look behind the scenes at the traditions of the most orthodox sect of Judaism The Jews have remained a people apart, separate from the nations This story gives a glimpse of the challenges they incurred as a people group after WWII The struggle was to keep their traditions intact, but at the same time to acclimate to their new home country of America Rich, rich, rich I have scouted out two others by the same author The Promise, which is a sequel to The Chosen, and My Name is Asher Lev, which some feel is Chaim Potok s best work

  8. Mike says:

    At its core The Chosen is about the relationship between two Brooklyn boys Danny and Reuven, the world they grow up in, and their relationship with their fathers Both are Jewish, but while they share the same faith, they belong to radically different portions of that faith Danny is Hasidic What she is the son of a Rebbe and expected to take up the mantle with the passing of his father Reuven, on the other hand, is part of modern Orthodox Judaism and is the son of a Talmudic teacher.Whi At its core The Chosen is about the relationship between two Brooklyn boys Danny and Reuven, the world they grow up in, and their relationship with their fathers Both are Jewish, but while they share the same faith, they belong to radically different portions of that faith Danny is Hasidic What she is the son of a Rebbe and expected to take up the mantle with the passing of his father Reuven, on the other hand, is part of modern Orthodox Judaism and is the son of a Talmudic teacher.While growing up mere blocks from each other they do not cross paths until a baseball game brings them together and then sends Reuven to the hospital when Danny slams a line drive into Reuven s face, breaking his glasses and sending glass into his eye So, not the best foot for a relationship to get off on Danny visits Reuven in the hospital and while Reuven is initially hostile to Danny his father convinces him to give Danny and chance and they begin to become friends.The relationship between the two boys blossoms as they grow up We discover Danny is brilliant, with a once in a generation mind who fears being trapped into the role of his people s Rebbe His father only speaks to him when they discuss the Talmud and forbids him from reading world book such as Freud and Darwin Reuven, while still very smart, is muchmathematically inclined than Danny In spite of their differences they become great friends, spending many evenings and Sabbaths together In the background WWII is coming to a close and the horrors of the Holocaust are being reveled.This leads to the big clash in the book, Zionism Immediately post WWII, when the full horrors that had been visited on the Jews was made widely known there was a resurgence in Zionism, specifically a homeland in British Palestine While many Jews were in favor of a return to their historic homeland, thereligious ones such as Edah HaChareidis thought that their could never be a Jewish state until the return of Messiah Danny s father passionately felt this way while Reuven s father was an ardent Zionist This matter was further complicated by Jewish terrorist attacks as well as attackes by Arabs and the British on Jewish neighborhoods and immigrants It was a huge mess and naturally the boys are caught in the middle with Danny s father forbidding Danny from seeing or interacting with Reuven Potok s writing in conveying all the emotions Reuven experiences throughout the book is stupendous We see him grow both as a person coming into his own as a man and his relationship with Danny We see his evolving attitude towards his own religion and how he chooses it to affect his life Naturally Potok, an orthodox rabbi himself, treats all these conflicts with a deft and empathetic hand There are no good guys or bad guys, just people trying to navigate the turbulent times they live in Even the rather monstrous silent treatment Danny s father subjects him to comes from a place of love and compassion The tragedy of the book is what circumstances people find themselves in through no fault of their own and how it affects their relationships with others But such is the nature of life, so beautifully encapsulated by this novel

  9. Emily says:

    I m really struggling with how to review this book It was beautifully written The relationships between Danny and Reuven and between Reuven and his father were real and touching I enjoyed learning about different systems of Jewish faith and the interactions or lack thereof between their communities The historic insights into WWII and its aftermath, particularly the realization among American Jews of the extent of the Holocaust and the formation of the state of Israel, were fascinating.But I m really struggling with how to review this book It was beautifully written The relationships between Danny and Reuven and between Reuven and his father were real and touching I enjoyed learning about different systems of Jewish faith and the interactions or lack thereof between their communities The historic insights into WWII and its aftermath, particularly the realization among American Jews of the extent of the Holocaust and the formation of the state of Israel, were fascinating.But I was so distracted and disturbed by Reb Saunders s coldness toward his own son, his lack of willingness and or ability to even talk to him outside of Talmudic discussion that it s difficult for me to get past it His explanation toward the end of the book didn t really help It was obvious that he loved his son and was incredibly proud of him, and that he truly believed that he made the best choice he could at the time in how to raise his son with a soul, though he admitted when asking for forgiveness from Danny, A wiser fathermay have done differently I am notwise My heart just ached for the pain and suffering he had put both himself and his son through And I was especially disheartened that Danny said he may raise his own son in silence, too, if I can t find another way I don t understand the reasoning behind being cruel to your child because this was definitely emotional abandonment and neglect, if not outright abuse in order to teach him compassion There are better ways to teach compassion, even to intellectual geniuses like Danny.Forbook reviews, visit my blog, Build Enough Bookshelves

  10. Elisabeth says:

    My brother Matt suggested this book, and I m very glad that I read it And glad that he was there to fill me in a littleon the history it brings up It is very well written, and enjoyable as well as educational It helped me better understand the Jewish faith and branches of Judaism, the horror of WWII, what is unique about American Jews, and some of the conflict over the Israel as a Jewish state Leaves you with a warm feeling and lots to think about The Talmud says that a person shou My brother Matt suggested this book, and I m very glad that I read it And glad that he was there to fill me in a littleon the history it brings up It is very well written, and enjoyable as well as educational It helped me better understand the Jewish faith and branches of Judaism, the horror of WWII, what is unique about American Jews, and some of the conflict over the Israel as a Jewish state Leaves you with a warm feeling and lots to think about The Talmud says that a person should do two things for himself One is to acquire a teacher the other is to choose a friendtwo people who are true friends are like two bodies with one soul

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