David's Story



David's StoryThe 1987 Publication Of You Can T Get Lost In Cape Town Won Zo Wicomb An International Readership And Wide Critical Acclaim As Richly Imagined And Stylistically Innovative As Wicomb S Debut Work, David S Story Is A Mesmerizing Novel, Multilayered And Multivoiced, At Times Elegiac, Wry, And Expansive.Unfolding In South Africa At The Moment Of Nelson Mandela S Release From Prison In 1991, The Novel Explores The Life And Vision Of David Dirkse, Part Of The Underground World Of Activists, Spies, And Saboteurs In The Liberation Movement A World Seldom Revealed To Outsiders With Time To Think After The Unbanning Of The Movement, David Is Researching His Roots In The History Of The Mixed Race Coloured People Of South Africa And Of Their Antecedents Among The Indigenous People And Early Colonial Settlers.But David Soon Learns That He Is On A Hit List, And, Caught In A Web Of Betrayal And Surveillance, He Is Forced To Rethink His Role In The Struggle For Nonracial Democracy, The Loyalty Of His Comrades, And His Own Conceptions Of Freedom Through Voices And Stories Of David And The Women Who Surround Him Responding To, Illuminating, And Sometimes Contradicting One Another Wicomb Offers A Moving Exploration Of The Nature Of Political Vision, Memory, And Truth.

Zo Wicomb attended the University of the Western Cape, and after graduating left South Africa for England in 1970, where she continued her studies at Reading University She lived in Nottingham and Glasgow and returned to South Africa in 1990, where she taught for three years in the department of English at the University of the Western Cape She gained attention in South Africa and internationally with her first work, a collection of short stories , You Can t Get Lost in Cape Town 1987 , which takes place during the apartheid era Her second novel, David s Story 2002 , takes place in 1991 toward the close of the apartheid era and uses the ambiguous classification of coloureds to explore racial identity Playing in the Light, her third novel, released in 2006, covers similar terrain conceptually, though this time set in contemporary South Africa and centering around a white woman who learns that her parents were actually coloured She published her second collection of short stories, The One That Got Away The stories, set mainly in Cape Town and Glasgow, explore a range of human relationships marriage, friendships, family ties or relations with servants.She was a winner of the 2013 Windham Campbell Literature Prize for Fiction.Zoe Wicomb resides in Glasgow where she teaches creative writing and post colonial literature at the University of Strathclyde.

[PDF / Epub] ☆ David's Story By Zoë Wicomb – Heartforum.co.uk
  • Paperback
  • 288 pages
  • David's Story
  • Zoë Wicomb
  • English
  • 27 November 2018
  • 1558613986

10 thoughts on “David's Story

  1. Melissa says:

    I read this book for a class, and I can say it s definitely not an easy read However, as I began to analyze the book , I began to understandandabout the story and why it was written the way it was David s Story is about truth, facts, fiction, and lies and the quest to find the hidden truth beneath the layers of time.This story is mostly told from the viewpoint of an unnamed narrator who is interviewing David, an MK soldier, who feels the need to record his life and family history I read this book for a class, and I can say it s definitely not an easy read However, as I began to analyze the book , I began to understandandabout the story and why it was written the way it was David s Story is about truth, facts, fiction, and lies and the quest to find the hidden truth beneath the layers of time.This story is mostly told from the viewpoint of an unnamed narrator who is interviewing David, an MK soldier, who feels the need to record his life and family history The story takes on a biased approach and forces the reader to try and dissect the facts from fiction what the narrator is implying or adding to the story, what David is adding to or subtracting from the story, other people s viewpoints on the story, the truths and lies of the apartheid struggle Yet, through the muddle of confusing stories, perspectives, there is one truth that remains constant in this story.Though it was a confusing read at first, I gradually began to appreciate this story , and I found it to be a very addicting read, because as I mentioned it forces you to do detective work along with David and the narrator I believe this is a very good book that focuses on the untold story and inner workings of the other side of the apartheid struggle

  2. Mirte says:

    It was very, very hard to make sense of this book It s a postmodern text in that it is very conscious of its own construction, issues of telling the truth and of personal perspectives, etc This does make for a difficult narrative, floating in the air, jumping from one time period to another, jumping from one consciousness to another and altogether not bothering too much with interpunction or a logical division of different paragraphs There is artistry in that, I guess, but in the end, one sho It was very, very hard to make sense of this book It s a postmodern text in that it is very conscious of its own construction, issues of telling the truth and of personal perspectives, etc This does make for a difficult narrative, floating in the air, jumping from one time period to another, jumping from one consciousness to another and altogether not bothering too much with interpunction or a logical division of different paragraphs There is artistry in that, I guess, but in the end, one should try to tell a story and not merely indicate how complex telling that story actually is, no matter how relevant this may be from a postcolonial point of view

  3. Franki says:

    This book was painful to read It did not flow or read as a story which, I can understand, is part of the purpose of this experimental type novel It has a lot of very quotable quotes, but it did not seem to really go anywhere or have very much to say, except that nothing that can be said can be known, or known to be It s complex, interesting, I guess, but I m not going to search out anything else by this author.

  4. Signe Hansen says:

    I am not really into postmodern writing at all, so this book never really got a hold of me At all But I guess it can be good if you like books like that What a generally helpful review this has been, don t you think Sorry

  5. Kristen Bingle says:

    Tricky read but definitely worth it A little confusing at times as she moves through so many voices and time frames so I think I need to re read this Explores the complexity and unreliability of telling stories as well as digging into the early days of post Apartheid South Africa from a Coloured perspective.

  6. Marcy says:

    Another book that I had higher expectations for and was a bit disappointed with I haven t read Wicomb s work since her collection of short stories You Can t Get Lost in Cape Town, which I remember loving But that was at a time where I had a much deeper affection for experimental, postmodern fiction and I realised reading this novel that I no longer crave that kind of disjointed narrative The premise of this book is quite interested and engaging specifically the role of the guerrilla movement Another book that I had higher expectations for and was a bit disappointed with I haven t read Wicomb s work since her collection of short stories You Can t Get Lost in Cape Town, which I remember loving But that was at a time where I had a much deeper affection for experimental, postmodern fiction and I realised reading this novel that I no longer crave that kind of disjointed narrative The premise of this book is quite interested and engaging specifically the role of the guerrilla movement that helped create a South Africa sans apartheid and that the primary person, David, around who the story is developed, is also the person who approached Wicomb asking her to help him tell his story I also appreciate the layered attention to theoccluded past of South Africans, especially the Griqua, are given a voice through this narrative and I learned quite a lot from reading the novel as a result I just wish the narrative wascoherent and cohesive

  7. Sanne Meijer says:

    I read this book for a class I m taking on post apartheid South Africa and I had a hard time reading this book It s such a complicated postmodern novel that I just can t give this book a rating However, I did give it a 3 stars rating since I m still undecided and had to pick a rating I need at least onereading to grasp this book and maybe I ll never totally understand this novel since its intertextuality and story are so complex The afterword by Dorothy Driver was really useful in unde I read this book for a class I m taking on post apartheid South Africa and I had a hard time reading this book It s such a complicated postmodern novel that I just can t give this book a rating However, I did give it a 3 stars rating since I m still undecided and had to pick a rating I need at least onereading to grasp this book and maybe I ll never totally understand this novel since its intertextuality and story are so complex The afterword by Dorothy Driver was really useful in understanding this novel, although I d rather would ve liked to read it before I started reading All in all, not an easy book to read and a challenge

  8. Keith says:

    A story that provides insight into post apartheid S.Africa and the difficulties of racial differences and identity Zoe Wicomb does an amazing job capturing the culture during this time frame Wicomb herself from S.Africa lives and teaches in Scotland The story is both engaging and insightful Wicomb weaves fiction into a real situation with elegance and style To fully grasp the impact of what she has done and the effort she has made, I advise reading interviews and articles about both the boo A story that provides insight into post apartheid S.Africa and the difficulties of racial differences and identity Zoe Wicomb does an amazing job capturing the culture during this time frame Wicomb herself from S.Africa lives and teaches in Scotland The story is both engaging and insightful Wicomb weaves fiction into a real situation with elegance and style To fully grasp the impact of what she has done and the effort she has made, I advise reading interviews and articles about both the book as well as Wicomb Also, to do brief research on the events of apartheid and the problems in their racial divides classification

  9. Fred Daly says:

    South African Despite an excess of postmodern tricks, this is a very interesting book Set right at the end of the apartheid era, it s about a man who has been a member of the Movement is having difficulty figuring out what to do and whom to trust There s a long scholarly essay at the end by a professor to explain things evidently the publisher wasn t confident the novel could speak for itself.

  10. Claire says:

    Read for Contemporary Postcolonial Lit.I don t know what I expected of this book, but it was so much complex and wonderfully written than I thought it was going to be There were moments that the narrators voice just shouts about everything and it s incredibly haunting and grounding I can t wait to delve into it and readfor my essay.

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