Which Side Are You On?: Trying to Be for Labor When It's Flat on Its Back




      Which Side Are You On?: Trying to Be for Labor When It's Flat on Its Back
When it first appeared in hardcover, Which Side Are You On received widespread critical accolades, and was nominated for a National Book Critics Circle Award for nonfiction In this new paperback edition, Thomas Geoghegan has updated his eloquent plea for the relevance of organized labor in America with an afterword covering the labor movement through the 1990s A funny, sharp, unsentimental career memoir, Which Side Are You On pairs a compelling history of the rise and near fall of labor in the United States with an idealist s disgruntled exercise in self evaluation Writing with the honesty of an embattled veteran still hoping for the best, Geoghegan offers an entertaining, accessible, and literary introduction to the labor movement, as well as an indispensable touchstone for anyone whose hopes have run up against the unaccommodating facts on the ground Wry and inspiring, Which Side Are You On is the ideal book for anyone who has ever woken up and realized, You must change your life. New Read Which Side Are You On?: Trying to Be for Labor When It's Flat on Its Back By Thomas Geoghegan For Kindle ePUB or eBook – heartforum.co.uk

Thomas Geoghegan received national attention when he ran as a progressive candidate for Rahm Emanuels congressional seat in 2009 and was endorsed by Barbara Ehrenreich, James Fallows, Thomas Frank, James K Galbraith, Hendrik Hertzberg, Alex Kotlowitz, Sara Paretsky, Rick Perlstein, Katha Pollitt, David Sirota, Garry Wills, and Naomi Wolf, among others He is a practicing attorney and the author of several books, including Which Side Are You On , which was a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award and received a special citation from the PEN Martha Albrand Award judges, In Americas Court, and See You in Court Geoghegan has written for The Nation, the New York Times, and Harpers He lives in Chicago.


      Which Side Are You On?: Trying to Be for Labor When It's Flat on Its Back
 By Thomas Geoghegan IBN : 1565848861 Format : Paperback – heartforum.co.uk
  • Paperback
  • 355 pages
  • Which Side Are You On?: Trying to Be for Labor When It's Flat on Its Back
  • Thomas Geoghegan
  • English
  • 26 August 2018
  • 1565848861

10 thoughts on “ Which Side Are You On?: Trying to Be for Labor When It's Flat on Its Back

  1. Libby says:

    i wish it wasrecent, would have liked to hear his thoughts on EFCA the latest dance between big labor and the Democrats p 42 A fine labor historian, Irving Bernstein, wrote about this period in his book The Lean Years, and there is an uncanny similarity between labor in the 1920s and labor in the 1980s Whole passages of the book, which he wrote in the 1950s, by the way, could be lifted verbatim to describe American labor today.For example Union members vote for Hoover then, and Reag i wish it wasrecent, would have liked to hear his thoughts on EFCA the latest dance between big labor and the Democrats p 42 A fine labor historian, Irving Bernstein, wrote about this period in his book The Lean Years, and there is an uncanny similarity between labor in the 1920s and labor in the 1980s Whole passages of the book, which...

  2. Aaron Arnold says:

    Not that I ve read a lot of books about labor law, but this is the most well written book about the experience of practicing labor law I ve ever read, a sort of ground level counterpart to the labor market sections of Krugman s book I once read anreview for another one of Geoghegan s books that claimed that all of his books ...

  3. Leonard Nakamura says:

    If you are interested in politics, this is a must read I had heard about this book for years and resisted reading it A book about the labor unions How sad Too depressing And, frankly, it is depressing Very But I learned a ton about what has happened and about the US laws many of them supported by good liberals that have made union organizing nearly impossible And the self inflicted wounds of undemocratic unions Also, the writing is wonderful Geoghegan is one of us in the same If you are interested in politics, this is a must read I had heard about this book for years and resisted reading it A book about the labor unions How sad Too depressing And, frankly, it is depressing Very But I learned a ton about what has happened and about the US laws many of them supported by good liberals that have made union organizing nearly impossible And the self inflicted wounds of undemocratic unions Also, the writing is wonderful Geoghegan is one of us in the same way that Ali Smith and Jennifer Egan are one of us, but also great sympathetic writers He admits his errors and doesn t get everything right, and has great empathy for everyone he tells us about And, in the afterword, he suggests a political path forward State by state, we could restore fundamental worker rights Such as the right not to be fired except for just cause or the rights to paid maternity leave or two weeks vacation He doesn t mention raising the rate of pay required before you are an exempt worker right now you ...

  4. Dave says:

    A great memoir from a career labor lawyer I can t imagine about CEO s and union busters being anywhere near as compelling, heartbreaking and, at times, uplifting but if someone wants to recommend one I m all ears.

  5. Roxanne says:

    Geoghegan is bougie and liberal but he s very transparent about it The book is a pretty good introduction to American labor politics.

  6. Mephistia says:

    I m kind of ambivalent about this book We re reading it for a class, and I really vacillate from one chapter to the next on whether I find this book helpful or not Geoghegan is definitely aware of his class privilege, so when starting out, I assumed he was equally aware of his race and gender privilege He pokes fun at himself regarding the class privilege, and obviously struggles with his apparently conflicting desires to live comfortably while representing those who cannot afford the same co I m kind of ambivalent about this book We re reading it fo...

  7. Jamie VW says:

    This book elicited intensely ambivalent emotions in me and I think overall, I came awayirritated than pleased Of course, I am biased as a labor organizer with my own many critiques of the movement and it seems clear that while we tend to lump together all unions into one storyline, everyone has a different union experience that tints their viewing lens In terms of his writing style, Geoghegan mostly succeeds in removing shop talk and jargon from his story and fits his personal narrative This book elicited intensely ambivalent emotions in me and I think overall, I came awayirritated than pleased Of course, I am biased as a labor organizer with my own many critiques of the movement and it seems clear that while we tend to lump together all unions into one storyline, everyone has a different union experience that tints their viewing lens In terms of his writing style, Geoghegan mostly succeeds in removing shop talk and jargon from his story and fits his personal narrative into the downward slope of the movement through the 60s into the time of Reaganomics I think what may be most fascinating is his tension of being well paid though, as he says time and time again, not as well paid as his other lawyer friends working for the bosses and living a bourgeois life while working on behalf of blue collar workers who he wavers between admiring and despising This mirrors a ten...

  8. Amc says:

    I liked this book because it flowed like a novel and has some nice deadpan comedy which helps if you like that style of humor You wouldn t need to be involved in the labor movement to enjoy or understand this book The text is also ridden with references to Christianity, particularly biblical If you re the least bit familiar with the Bible and paying attention, you ll pick up on the subtle references and inuendos, which are hilarious because Geoghegan uses them to compare workers and events I liked this book because it flowed like a novel and has some nice deadpan comedy which helps if you like that style of humor You wouldn t need to be involved in the labor movement to enjoy or understand this book The text is also ridden with references to Christianity, part...

  9. Irving Koppel says:

    If one is already depressed about the status of labor in America,he probably shouldn t read this book Total union membership,except for government employees and the Service Employees InternationalUnion S.E.I.U has reached its nadir in America There are many reasons for this outsourcing,rise of information technology,threats to close businesses in the face of union organization,weak and corrupt union leadership,non democratic unionelections,restrictive,anti union laws,allowing strikebreaker If one is already depressed abo...

  10. Tracy says:

    I thought this book was a little strange A lot of it is really interesting and enlightening, but he s doing this weird thing of saying he feels like an outsider in the labor movement because he s an intellectual yuppie from Harvard his words , and then complaining that the labor movement doesn t live up to his own expectations of what it should be trying to do in the country world I know he s calling himself a yuppie in an intentionally self deprecating way, but it s kind of true I mean, dud I thought this book was a little strange A lot of it is really interesting and enlightening, but he s doing this weird thing of saying he feels like an outsider in the labor movement because he s an intellectual yuppie from Harvard his words , and then complaining that the labor movement...

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