God Is Red: A Native View of Religion

God Is Red: A Native View of Religion[KINDLE] ❆ God Is Red: A Native View of Religion ❤ Vine Deloria Jr. – Heartforum.co.uk First published in , Vine Deloria Jr s God Is Red remains the seminal work on Native religious views, asking new questions about our species and our ultimate fate Celebrating three decades in publicat First published in , Vine Deloria Jr Red: A PDF Ç s God Is Red remains the seminal work on Native religious views, asking new questions about our species and our ultimate fate Celebrating three decades God Is Kindle - in publication with a special th anniversary edition, this classic work reminds us to learn that we are a part of nature, not a transcendent species with no responsibilities to the natural world Is Red: A eBook ´ It is time again to listen to Vine Deloria Jr s powerful voice, telling us about religious life that is independent of Christianity and that reveres the interconnectedness of all living things.

Vine Victor Deloria, Jr was an American Red: A PDF Ç Indian author, theologian, historian, and activist He was widely known for his book Custer Died for Your Sins An Indian Manifesto , which helped God Is Kindle - generate national attention to Native American issues in the same year as the Alcatraz Red Power Movement From , he had served as executive director of the National Congress of American Indians, Is Red: A eBook ´ increasing tribal membership from to Beginning in , he was a board member of the National Museum of the American Indian, which now has buildings in both New York City and Washington, DCDeloria began his academic career in at Western Washington State College at Bellingham, Washington He became Professor of Political Science at the University of Arizona , where he established the first master s degree program in American Indian Studies in the United States After ten years at the University of Colorado, Boulder, he returned to Arizona and taught at the School of Law.

God Is Red: A Native View of Religion PDF/EPUB Ö Is
  • Paperback
  • 325 pages
  • God Is Red: A Native View of Religion
  • Vine Deloria Jr.
  • English
  • 07 October 2018
  • 1555914985

10 thoughts on “God Is Red: A Native View of Religion

  1. Allison says:

    Oh dear I agree with the overall thrust of this book, but the scholarship , such as it is, to back up the claims is at best shallow and at worst absurd Deloria combines a disdainful and incredibly superficial analysis of Christianity, compressing 2,000 years of human religious thought into a handful of shameful or embarrassing anecdotes, with a rosy and almost equally superficial analysis of Native religion He confuses concepts, refuses to define his terms, and resorts to outlandish fa Oh dear I agree with the overall thrust of this book, but the scholarship , such as it is, to back up the claims is at best shallow and at worst absurd Deloria combines a disdainful and incredibly superficial analysis of Christianity, compressing 2,000 years of human religious thought into a handful of shameful or embarrassing anecdotes, with a rosy and almost equally superficial analysis of Native religion He confuses concepts, refuses to define his terms, and resorts to outlandish fad science from the 70s to back up claims that perhaps the world is different than Western mainstream thought interprets it ancient astronauts really He berates modern white people for idealizing Native Americans and in the very next chapter makes statements like, The Indian does not fear death In some chapters he seems to include all American indigenous peoples in his scope i.e including Central and South America , but in one chapter in particular he ridicules the Near Eastern god as being a belligerent egotistical man demanding absolute worship and blood sacrifice, as opposed to Indian religion, by which I assume he s excepting the Maya and Aztec et al or else that contrast doesn t make sense.He does make some excellent and quite incisive points about modern American culture and our relationship to the environment, but those good points are sparse among silly insults, willfully flimsy analysis, and even outright falsehoods i.e the Ancient Egyptians didn t care about immortality, that s just a modern Western interpretationhuh This book has been a to read for a while, and boy am I glad that s over with

  2. Michaela Wood says:

    I really was amazed with the things Vine Deloria Jr can tell you that you never thought to ask His writing is a strong call to the kind of self analysis that helps white Americans to grow up, examine their values, and shamed faced ask the questions that have never occurred to them before I feel like I could listen to these thoughts for the rest of my life on loop and only be the better for it.

  3. Katherine says:

    I put this on the back burner, as it s not exactly read for 10 minutes before bed material, but it has given me many new things to think about So far, his main point has been the difference between an emphasis on history and an emphasis on place He argues that Native American religious belief is based on a strong connection to place, while many other belief systems emphasize history especially Christianity, but he also mentions many other major religions I m pretty sure you could say the I put this on the back burner, as it s not exactly read for 10 minutes before bed material, but it has given me many new things to think about So far, his main point has been the difference between an emphasis on history and an emphasis on place He argues that Native American religious belief is based on a strong connection to place, while many other belief systems emphasize history especially Christianity, but he also mentions many other major religions I m pretty sure you could say the same for most indigenous belief systems He argues that this greatly affects the ethical and moral behavior of the believers Native American beliefs aredirected towards community, place, and current needs, while the rest of us aredirected towards moral codes that we usually don t feel a need to follow very closely He believes that a return by Native Americans to their indigenous belief systems will help bring communities back together and work to heal some problems At least that s what I ve gathered from the first few chapters In addition, one of the things that has really struck me is his statement that in this land the US , God is red ie, the indigenous belief system of all the land that we drive over, build houses, malls, and schools on, and generally foul up is that of its indigenous people The rest of us are aliens This book especially struck me on this point, as I picked it up at a bookstore on the Umatilla Reservation in Eastern Oregon and read it while in what was the homeland of the Nez Perce until the white people decided it was choice territory and forced them into Idaho

  4. Brian says:

    This is a dense book that deals with a lot of issues, and I m not going to be able to cover them all here because I have limited space and my reviews are long enough anyway So, I m not going go into depth on Native American history leading up to the 1970s, the legal basis for depriving the Native Americans of their land though see Conquest by Law for an in depth treatment on that , the romanticization of long dead Indians while ignoring modern Indians struggle for justice, and so on They are This is a dense book that deals with a lot of issues, and I m not going to be able to cover them all here because I have limited space and my reviews are long enough anyway So, I m not going go into depth on Native American history leading up to the 1970s, the legal basis for depriving the Native Americans of their land though see Conquest by Law for an in depth treatment on that , the romanticization of long dead Indians while ignoring modern Indians struggle for justice, and so on They are in there, though.The main interest I had in this book was in the religious analysis, which probably isn t surprising considering the title, so the initial modern history lesson in the beginning of the book kind of threw me off But after setting the stage, it veers off and starts talking about Christianity in relation to Native religions, and that s where my interest really picked up G d Is Red has a pretty uniformly negative view of Christianity It starts off talking about a difference between religions with a temporal focus, like Christianity s view of the creation of the world, its doctrine as a series of revealed truths which resonate down to the present day, and its teleological and eschatological focus, and religions with a spacial focus that have a specific land where its practitioners live and specific holy places where the rites are practiced, like the old sacrificial cult of the Temple in pre exilic Israelite religion and I m not just inserting that for egotistical reasons, because Deloria does make a connection that Judaism is one of the few mainstream religions that still has a lot of the characteristics of a tribal religion Christianity s claim to apply to all people of all times makes its practitioners have an extremely difficult time understanding how other people can be tied to the land to the extent that, say, they re willing to turn down a large amount of money because they d rather keep their land even when a lot of them are desperately poor, as happened with Blue Lake and the Taos Pueblo.Deloria heavily criticizes this temporal focus, both for its supposed tendency to make Christians focus on the concerns of the next world at the expense of this one, and for its lack of any tie to the land along with the focus on stewardship or subduing the earth, leading to a lack of ecological awareness and directly contributing to the upcoming ecological catastrophe.The main criticism, though, is about Christianity s universality If Christianity is universal and is the true and correct religion, then how come its history is so filled with horrors And if all those horrors were committed by people who aren t real Christians, then where are the real Christians and why didn t they stand up and try to stop all the murderers, or at least to speak out This is an old criticism and dealt with extensively elsewhere, but what I liked was Deloria s mention that in claiming no innate cultural attributes, Christianity is vulnerable to taking on attributes of whatever culture it s practiced in It s very easy to see the American culture in megachurches, television faith healers, stadium prayer revivals, and Christian rock, but anefarious example is how Christianity has been used to justify bigotry, torture, murder, slavery, and genocide throughout history It s supposed to be transformative, but there s little evidence of that In his words, Christianity can describe ideal behavior but cannot produce it.The book then contrasts tribal religion with that, saying that since tribal religion is focused on the needs of a particular people and isn t generalizable outside that group, it doesn t produce the religious animus that Christianity does Since the important point of the religion is the daily practice and the tribal rituals, and not the absolute truth of its claims about the past, increasing scientific discoveries do not automatically produce the somewhat uncomfortable attitude that Christianity has with modernity Tribes might war, and they might conquer each other, but they wouldn t try to impose their own religion on each other because the very idea makes no sense The other tribe has different ancestors, so the idea of imposing on them other practices wouldn t even make sense And the tie of tribes to particular land means that Native Americans are the spiritual owners of America, which is part of why the image of the Indian is evoked so often in ecological terms.There are some obvious problems here, of course Plenty of Christians are concerned with daily practice, plenty of Christians manage to maintain their religion while treating its claims as metaphors, and Deloria himself mentions that modern Native Americans with aWestern worldview are concerned about the scientific truth behind the claims of their ancestral religions Some of these objections are dealt with, but in the interests of space I ll just mention that and go on.I admit I ve had some of these thoughts before, but in the modern world it s harder to talk about ancestral religions without dealing with the modern concept of race, and that leads you to creepy neopagan groups that bristle when black people want to join or the various neo Nazis that give Asatru a bad name The lack of community in Western culture is something that a lot of sociologists have noticed in books like Bowling Alone The Collapse and Revival of American Community, though I admit that one of the best places I ever lived was in a small mountain town in Japan, where our students grandparents farmed rice and the graves of their ancestors dotted the mountainsides around the town, but modern global capitalism is engaged in a relentless assault on the ability to live that kind of lifestyle with its requirements that everyone be always ready to learn a totally new skill and relocate to somewhere far away from friends and family And it might have just as likely ended up with me being shut out of community life for being an outsider At least if I m experiencing modern alienation, I can be assured that my neighbors and I are together in our apartness.There are some major flaws in the book, though The first and most blatant is the bizarre diversion off into Immanuel Velikovsky s Worlds in Collision and its theories about Venus being a comet and Venus and Mars ping ponging around the solar system to produce many of the ancient accounts of miracles Deloria even directly states that science is confirmingof his beliefs, and soon his theories will become accepted truth The thing isno, they won t Velikovsky s theories are complete rubbish You may say that I m inculcated with Western views of scientific truth, and you d be right, but this whole section hacked a star off the book all by itself because it s total nonsense.Another one is how Deloria talks about tribal religions being designed for a particular people inhabiting a particular place, and not having the kind of universal claims that Christianity does, but then he treats them as some kind of block group with universal characteristics set up in contrast to Christianity As one example, the Aztecs went out and conquered other tribes around them, and they did subject those tribes to their religion by demanding members of those tribes be surrended for their sacrificial rituals That s part of why Cort s had such an easy time of it, because all the surrounding tribes hated the Aztecs so much that they were happy to help anyone who might be trouble I don t know enough about the breadth of Native religions to provide an accurate commentary, but considering the hundreds of tribes that existed I wouldn t be surprised if it were possible to find counterpoints to all of Deloria s points just by looking hard enough even if the general shape of his arguments is correct G d Is Red is thought provoking and dense, but I m not really sure that it s that deep It s also quite dated in its analysis of modern culture the comments on the shape of women s rights and the loss of Christianity s influence look hilarious in light of the Republican Party s hatred of all that is good and pure, for example Nonetheless, I m glad I saw a recommendation to read it when I went to the National Museum of the American Indian, and if any of arguments within interest you I d suggest that you read it too

  5. Nathan says:

    Angry and polemical Deloria has some painfully valid points, but he throws the baby out with the bath water along with the tub, shampoo and shower curtain In relegating all but native religion to a nightmarish Oral Roberts Jerry Falwell bogeyman of conservative evangelicalism, he damns his own thesis which, ostensibly, calls for respect and mutual flexibility I don t deny the horrors that American Christianity has brought upon the First Peoples, but I do resent Deloria s assumption that Chris Angry and polemical Deloria has some painfully valid points, but he throws the baby out with the bath water along with the tub, shampoo and shower curtain In relegating all but native religion to a nightmarish Oral Roberts Jerry Falwell bogeyman of conservative evangelicalism, he damns his own thesis which, ostensibly, calls for respect and mutual flexibility I don t deny the horrors that American Christianity has brought upon the First Peoples, but I do resent Deloria s assumption that Christianity is merely the sum of its worst adherents

  6. Kevin welter says:

    Vine Deloria Jr does for spirituality and responsibility to the earth and community with God is Red, what he did for history and perception of policies in Custer Died For Your Sins he sets it straight He offers an interesting missing piece and alternative history for all that seek to find the truth.

  7. Jody says:

    I really was expecting to hear the native view of God with stories from the various tribes Instead it seemed to be an attack on Christian religions, and while I think there s a lot to be criticized about the way Christian religions are run, I could read that in any number of other books I wanted a NATIVE view I probably should have give this 1 star.

  8. Jessaka says:

    This scholarly work by Vine Deloria, Jr is a difficult read You must really have a desire to learn Native American history accurately, and Vine Deloria is the right person for this endeavor as he was a Native American author, theologian, historian, and activist I can imagine that this book is being used in colleges in their Native American classes, and I believe I would have preferred to have studied this with a professor than to have read it on my own, as I would have learned so muchth This scholarly work by Vine Deloria, Jr is a difficult read You must really have a desire to learn Native American history accurately, and Vine Deloria is the right person for this endeavor as he was a Native American author, theologian, historian, and activist I can imagine that this book is being used in colleges in their Native American classes, and I believe I would have preferred to have studied this with a professor than to have read it on my own, as I would have learned so muchthan I had While this book took in the history of the Native Americans, even the political movement of the 70s, I will stick with the religious aspects of the book.White Belly, photo by Edward CurtisMany Native Americans rejected Christianity for various reasons but many were forced into Christianity Holy grounds had been taken away, as were their religious ceremonies Still, those who were the strongest, held onto their beliefs and fought for their rights.There are many differences in Native American spirituality and the Christian religion, but I don t wish to take up all of them For one thing, the Native Americans didn t have a personal God in the same sense as the Christians, nor did they believe that they needed a personal savior It was never in their teaching it didn t make sense to them In their religion there is no concept of the fall, so the whole of creation was good and everything had to work together for the good of all As Young Chief said The Great Spirit tells me to take care of the Indians, to feed them The water says the same thing Feed the Indians well The grass says the same thing Feed the Indians well The ground says, The Great Spirit placed me here to produce all that grows on me, trees and fruit The same way the ground says, It was from me man was made The Great Spirit, in placing men on earth, desired them to take good care of the ground and to do each other no harm When Young Spirit said that the trees talk to him, he meant just that, for Walking Buffalo remarked, Did you know that trees talk Well they do They talk to each other, and they ll talk to you if you listen Trouble is, white people don t listen They never learned to listen to the Indians, so I don t suppose they ll listen to other voices in nature But I have learned a lot from trees sometimes about the weather, sometimes, about animals, sometimes about the Great Spirit Vine Deloria believes that white man has become alienated from nature and believes he must tame it As a result the earth is being destroyed Chief Luther Standing Bear wrote We did not think of the great open plains, the beautiful rolling hills, and the winding streams with tangled growth as wild Only to the white man was nature a wilderness and only to him was the land infested with wild animals and savage people To us it was tame The earth was beautiful and we were surrounded with the blessings of the Great Mystery As for a need to analyze or understand God, there is no reason to do so to the Indian Deloris writes, There is no discernible reason for primitive or tribal peoples to abandon their ceremonial life and spend their time trying to arrive at a clear description of a deity and its several powers Religion for them is an experience and they have no reason to reduce it to systematic thought and the elaboration of concepts And as for death Indians believe that they will return to nature and that their bodies will become dust but that their souls will either go on another journey or will come back to their tribe My thought is, if you are close to nature and believe in caring for it and for all life on it, you are close enough to God.Winter Apsaroke, photo by Edward Curtis

  9. Reiden says:

    The view of religion presented in this book was unlike anything I have heard taught in school or church I started reading this book while taking a comparative religions class I wish I would finished it before the class ended it would have given me muchto discuss For instance, in class we learned about the evolution of religion, and how religions naturally go through several stages, ending in a monotheistic savior God style of religion hmm Deloria attacks this type of thinking and The view of religion presented in this book was unlike anything I have heard taught in school or church I started reading this book while taking a comparative religions class I wish I would finished it before the class ended it would have given me muchto discuss For instance, in class we learned about the evolution of religion, and how religions naturally go through several stages, ending in a monotheistic savior God style of religion hmm Deloria attacks this type of thinking and shows how academic religious studies have primarily been conducted with a bias towards Western religions.The book also explores the strong relationship Natives Americans have with the geography in which they have lived, as well as the plant and animal kingdom they encounter Their religions are meant to help people survive harmoniously with the land Also, unlike Western religions, those of the Native Americas lack theological dogma Deloria shows how this lack of theology created healthier societies that were able to survive sustainably for long periods of time While he doesn t come out and say one style of religion is better than the other, he does build a case against Western religion Christianity in most cases I don t think this book would be an enjoyable read for anyone who follows a strong Christian belief system Having said this, I think it would be a great read for anyone who lives in the US, as it offers a deeper understanding of why Natives to this day value their ancestral land so dearly

  10. Kate says:

    Deloria makes some really brilliant, succinct points about Native American religion, Christianity, and the Western world At the same time, his thought process seems to be scattered with his writing being at times too abstract and wandering to be easily followed At the same time, he tries to cover so many topics that I never felt as though anything except the points I will mention in the next paragraph was really explored in depth He is a very biased author, but then that is by his own admis Deloria makes some really brilliant, succinct points about Native American religion, Christianity, and the Western world At the same time, his thought process seems to be scattered with his writing being at times too abstract and wandering to be easily followed At the same time, he tries to cover so many topics that I never felt as though anything except the points I will mention in the next paragraph was really explored in depth He is a very biased author, but then that is by his own admission, so that does not bother me so much Yet, despite moments of brilliance, reading God Is Red sometimes feels like walking into a lecture hall where you get a half hour of lecture and a half hour of the professor taking off his pants and dancing the Time Warp I m referring to Deloria s excessively long winded and highly questionable defense of some pretty out there conspiracy theories While I understand why he would want to believe those theories, it was bizarre and out of place in this book to read 10 pages of Deloria defending Velikovsky s hypothesis and another dozen pages defending ancient astronauts as things that totally happened and through which we should all view the development of religions These strange arguments cheapened the genuinely excellent points that Deloria made elsewhere in the book Deloria s background is in history, religion, and politics and that is where he excels It s when he tries to make authoritative arguments about science and what science is or is not that he really stumbles

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