Ticknor

Ticknor[Read] ➳ Ticknor By Sheila Heti – Heartforum.co.uk On a cold, rainy night, an aging bachelor named George Ticknor prepares to visit his childhood friend Prescott, a successful man who is now one of the leading intellectual lights of their generation W On a cold, rainy night, an aging bachelor named George Ticknor prepares to visit his childhood friend Prescott, a successful man who is now one of the leading intellectual lights of their generation With a hastily baked pie in his hands, and a lifetime of guilt and insecurity weighing upon his soul, he sets out for the Prescotts dinner party a party at which he d just as soon never arrive Distantly inspired by the real life friendship between the great historian William Hickling Prescott and his biographer, Ticknor is a witty, fantastical study of resentment and a biting history of a one sided friendship.

Sheila Heti is the author of five books three books of fiction, a children s book, and a work of non fiction with Misha Glouberman She is Interviews Editor at The Believer and is known for her long interviews She lives in Toronto.

Paperback  ñ Ticknor eBook Ä
  • Paperback
  • 128 pages
  • Ticknor
  • Sheila Heti
  • English
  • 09 February 2017
  • 0312426631

10 thoughts on “Ticknor

  1. Michael Vagnetti says:

    What happens, in biography, when people become word people I experienced Ticknor as an exhibit puzzle, or documentary sculpture, about this question The book is on to this meta dynamic in a cunning way The oracle sage is speaker who is stumbling with neurosis, unconfident, and of existentially cloudy presence He is cognitively wrong in term of literary makeup, choices, and quality , but his timid anthems are extraordinarily interesting Why They coagulate into an extended, oblique riddle What happens, in biography, when people become word people I experienced Ticknor as an exhibit puzzle, or documentary sculpture, about this question The book is on to this meta dynamic in a cunning way The oracle sage is speaker who is stumbling with neurosis, unconfident, and of existentially cloudy presence He is cognitively wrong in term of literary makeup, choices, and quality , but his timid anthems are extraordinarily interesting Why They coagulate into an extended, oblique riddle on being Build a seminar on it, theorists.Reading Ticknor is a weird experience in self assessment It is written in a modern interpolation of late 19th century period language that is studded with rereadable profundities that wink and peek out of the dross Picture someone reading about someone writing about someone else, and, in a leap of imagination, watch imaginary tracers buzz through the resulting stream of consciousness You might approach a kind of frontier In front of you is the broad expanse of things have to do with reading and writing that no one acknowledges It is a space of false silence things ride on words that pass through us unrecognized, but with noisy effects.How do the words you use create trust, make people change their mind about you, erode you What is forgotten What is essential Why do some paragraphs seem relevant, while others are obtuse How much can you skip over and still get by What makes an approach obsessive, or crass What creates influence Why are some people prattling into the void, while others are lionized How does this happen These are Ticknor s problems, Ticknor s problems, and yours

  2. Ursula Pflug says:

    This review appeared in The Peterborough Examiner in December, 2005 TICKNOR by Sheila Heti House Of Anansi Press April 2005 HC 112 pages 19.95 ISBN 0 88784 191 0 Review by Ursula Pflug 515 words Ticknor is Toronto writer Sheila Heti s first novel Her previous book, also published by Anansi, was a collection of confounding, quirky, clever short stories about, among other things an old woman who lived in a shoe And since rewritten fairy tales or in this case nursery rhymes written for the adu This review appeared in The Peterborough Examiner in December, 2005 TICKNOR by Sheila Heti House Of Anansi Press April 2005 HC 112 pages 19.95 ISBN 0 88784 191 0 Review by Ursula Pflug 515 words Ticknor is Toronto writer Sheila Heti s first novel Her previous book, also published by Anansi, was a collection of confounding, quirky, clever short stories about, among other things an old woman who lived in a shoe And since rewritten fairy tales or in this case nursery rhymes written for the adult contemporary reader are one of my absolutely favourite things, well, I was smitten by The Middle Stories Even the stories that weren t based on fairy tales read like fairy tales The Middle Stories garnered lots of attention, most of it praise, along with a little puzzlement And Heti was young and cool and lived in New York as well as Toronto and had her stories published in McSweeney s, and got people feeling cranky because of it I wasn t cranky I ate the stories like the chocolates I thought they were Ticknor is about a couple of 19th century male writers in Boston, but it s not a historical novel in any traditional sense It all takes place on one night, in one man s mind, that of George Ticknor, a Prufrockian sort who sporadically publishes long dull articles about canals, and lives in rented rooms while his few suits get shabbier and shabbier He s a bit of a sad sack, our George, and envies his childhood friend William Prescott, who is an ambitious, driven, and wildly successful historian in spite of compromised eyesight due to a bun catching him in the eye at boarding school, which really happened Ticknor and Prescott are historical figures, but this novel in no way tries to give us an accurate account of their lives Heti was inspired to write it after swiping a Ticknor biography of Prescott from an Annex pub down in the big smoke But she didn t read the book from end to end she slipped in and out of it, engaging in a process wherein the style and the feelings in Ticknor s book influenced the style and psychology of her own In Ticknor, Ticknor has been invited to a soiree at Prescott s home, a place awash in good food and drink, pretty women, and the leading lights of the time Anyone who has ever dithered even a little about an invitation will empathize with poor George, who does nothing but dither The novel is basically a meditation on failure and envy and the aspects of friendship often little discussed Poor George s mental tape loops go over and over the same ground for over a hundred pages as he worries about what to wear and what to bring and whether to even go and changes his mind on each count a dozen times We feel sorry for Ticknor we pity him we don t particularly like the Prescott we are shown, and wonder if George couldn t have pulledout of the fabric of his own life and gifts than to spend most of it looking over his shoulder at his friend, feeling he compares badly, hoping for attention Like The Middle Stories, Ticknor is sharp and clever and short and fearsomely original But I liked The Middle Stories

  3. Patty Cottrell says:

    one of my favorite books you can read it in an afternoon there are some unforgettable lines i had three of them in my head for a year without realizing where they were from TICKNOR the writing is crisp and elegant TICKNOR i loved the sad pathetic narrator TICKNOR one of my favorite books you can read it in an afternoon there are some unforgettable lines i had three of them in my head for a year without realizing where they were from TICKNOR the writing is crisp and elegant TICKNOR i loved the sad pathetic narrator TICKNOR

  4. Nathanimal says:

    A great little book that really exploits the first person lens, both in voice and perspective She s too young to write this good

  5. Amber says:

    Favourite Character N ALeast Favourite Character N APros There were some real stand out lines in this book I was moved to re read a few sections of prose two or three times because of how striking they were.Cons I really didn t like the creative element of this book was it a conversation Sometimes there would be a sentence or two from a different speaker, but it would not be differentiated in any way in the long blocks of text It was just difficult to get a reading flow going I kept bei Favourite Character N ALeast Favourite Character N APros There were some real stand out lines in this book I was moved to re read a few sections of prose two or three times because of how striking they were.Cons I really didn t like the creative element of this book was it a conversation Sometimes there would be a sentence or two from a different speaker, but it would not be differentiated in any way in the long blocks of text It was just difficult to get a reading flow going I kept being pulled out of it

  6. l. says:

    incredibly irritating for such a short book.

  7. Ronald Wilcox says:

    What is there to say about this book Has some good prose in it at times but overall the story did not draw me in Did it even have a story Hard to say Very tangential or free flowing writing

  8. Lily says:

    I had read Sheila Heti srecent book which upon looking back at it was some Lena Dunham esque drivel that made no important or lasting points But this novella was totally different in tone, style, settingpretty much everything Surprising Ticknor is a horribly insecure, self loathing man living in Boston and London who spends a long winter night frittering away obsessing over his ailing friend Prescott It was so interesting to read about intense social anxiety and deep, bottom of a wel I had read Sheila Heti srecent book which upon looking back at it was some Lena Dunham esque drivel that made no important or lasting points But this novella was totally different in tone, style, settingpretty much everything Surprising Ticknor is a horribly insecure, self loathing man living in Boston and London who spends a long winter night frittering away obsessing over his ailing friend Prescott It was so interesting to read about intense social anxiety and deep, bottom of a well like depression in the 1800s, when men had to uphold so many expectations I mean can you imagine a man in a top hat and spats who is so worried about what others think of him Well that is exactly who Ticknor was The way he coveted Prescott s life wife, career, charisma was frankly pathetic He is also so territorial and possessive of him, prizing his childhood memories above everyone else s, those who only knew him as an adult In all, of all the great sorrows that marked the day of his passing, none was so great as mine, none so carefully tuned to the harmony of his own light, which had shrouded me since we were boys It s almost feminine the way he heaps praise on this guy not just praise, but like I AM HIS BEST FRIEND, ME Again not something you see much in literature, and certainly not of men of that era.Sheila Heti is actually a beautiful writer here See contrasting thoughts on her millennial nonsense, above She writes about Prescott s contagious smile, a smile as natural to him as the feeling of hunger in others And Ticknor s thoughts about Prescott s feelings towards his adulatory social circle his friends who were perhaps like so many social ornaments,like the jewelry on the hands of one so admired than intimates at all I found myself having to concentrate so hard on this little book It was very modernist is that the literary style I m looking for so much so as to be almost opaque on the page Stream of consciousness, confusing perspectives, and a lot of Ticknor writing letters to tertiary characters that never have much importance to the story or giving himself these very negative pep talks using the second person I was pretty impressed by this as a technical piece of writing I only give it a three because intellectually I really liked it, but content wise and narrative wise, not my favorite

  9. Australis says:

    It is a very clear reflection of just how profoundly limited the world of literary reviews and awards is when a a writer such as Sheila Heti receives such accolades for her first novel Ticknor How is this novel in any way a worthwhile exploration of the profoundly complex emotion of resentment It is so completely myopic in its treatment of Ticknor that it is laughable and completely inane Unfortunately it s not surprising yet still still disillusioning that writers such as Heti are celebrate It is a very clear reflection of just how profoundly limited the world of literary reviews and awards is when a a writer such as Sheila Heti receives such accolades for her first novel Ticknor How is this novel in any way a worthwhile exploration of the profoundly complex emotion of resentment It is so completely myopic in its treatment of Ticknor that it is laughable and completely inane Unfortunately it s not surprising yet still still disillusioning that writers such as Heti are celebrated as insightful when they are merely showboating with language with no real understanding of the substance of the material with which they are supposed to be engaged

  10. Brad Turner says:

    Most of me wants to rate this book even worse It s rare that I read something I enjoy so little But part of me believes in the promise of challenging and unconventional literary work that, like poetry requires decoding Part of me suspects that this book is like difficult convention bending or just sophisticated music that repays multiple listening and is enhanced by familiarity Part of me thinks there s value here even if I can t see it For better or for worse, this part of me lost with th Most of me wants to rate this book even worse It s rare that I read something I enjoy so little But part of me believes in the promise of challenging and unconventional literary work that, like poetry requires decoding Part of me suspects that this book is like difficult convention bending or just sophisticated music that repays multiple listening and is enhanced by familiarity Part of me thinks there s value here even if I can t see it For better or for worse, this part of me lost with this one.Sheila Heti plays with and subverts some touchstones of conventional modernist work, like the reliable narrator, linear or continuous narrative, and for a historical novel clear relation to actual historical figures, on which the book is at least indirectly based I don t know whether to laugh or cry at the way sincere reviewers and whatever marketing hack wrote the backflap gestures at a narrative arc in this book Don t read the backflap it s nonsense Certainly there is a scene, fragmented and distributed, about an envious, self pitying wretch carrying a pie in the rain There are sense impressions distributed across the years and a few distinct events Heri can write, which is a something This book reminded me of other psycho drama monologues including Saul Bellow s Dangling Man and Dostoevsky s Notes from Underground At least this one was short

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