The White Man's Burden: Why the West's Efforts to Aid the Rest Have Done So Much Ill and So Little Good

The White Man's Burden: Why the West's Efforts to Aid the Rest Have Done So Much Ill and So Little Good[Reading] ➽ The White Man's Burden: Why the West's Efforts to Aid the Rest Have Done So Much Ill and So Little Good Author William Easterly – Heartforum.co.uk From one of the world s best known development economists an excoriating attack on the tragic hubris of the West s efforts to improve the lot of the so called developing worldIn his previous book, The Man's Burden: ePUB ✓ From one of the world s best known development economists an excoriating attack on the tragic hubris of the West s efforts to improve the lot of the so called developing worldIn his previous book, The Elusive Quest for Growth, William Easterly criticized the utter ineffectiveness of Western organizations to mitigate global poverty, and he was promptly fired by his then employer, the World Bank The White Man The White Epub / s Burden is his widely anticipated counterpunch a brilliant and blistering indictment of the West s economic policies for the world s poor Sometimes angry, sometimes irreverent, but always clear eyed and rigorous, Easterly argues that we in the West need to face our own history of ineptitude and draw the proper conclusions, especially at a time when the question of our ability to transplant Western institutions has become White Man's Burden: eBook ↠ one of the most pressing issues we face.

Man's Burden: ePUB ✓ William Easterly is Professor of Economics at New York University, joint with Africa House, and Co Director of NYU s Development Research Institute He is editor of Aid Watch blog, Associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research and Co Editor of the Journal of Development Economics He is the author of The White Man s Burden How the West s Efforts to Aid the Rest Have Done The White Epub / So Much Ill and So Little Good Penguin, , The Elusive Quest for Growth Economists Adventures and Misadventures in the Tropics MIT, , other co edited books, and articles in refereed economics journals William Easterly received his PhD in Economics at MIT He was born in West Virginia and is the th most famous native of Bowling Green, Ohio, where he grew up He spent White Man's Burden: eBook ↠ sixteen years as a Research Economist at the World Bank He is on the board of the anti malaria philanthropy, Nets for Life His work has been discussed in media outlets like the Lehrer Newshour, National Public Radio, the BBC, the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, the New York Review of Books, the Washington Post, the Economist, the New Yorker, Forbes, Business Week, the Financial Times, the Times of London, the Guardian, and the Christian Science Monitor Foreign Policy magazine inexplicably named him one of the world s Top Public Intellectuals in His areas of expertise are the determinants of long run economic growth, the political economy of development, and the effectiveness of foreign aid He has worked in most areas of the developing world, most heavily in Africa, Latin America, and Russia William Easterly is an associate editor of the American Economic Journals Macroeconomics, the Journal of Comparative Economics and the Journal of Economic Growth Taken from his website.

The White Man's Burden: Why the West's Efforts to Aid the
    Import EPUB to the Program Import EPUB promptly fired by his then employer, the World Bank The White Man The White Epub / s Burden is his widely anticipated counterpunch a brilliant and blistering indictment of the West s economic policies for the world s poor Sometimes angry, sometimes irreverent, but always clear eyed and rigorous, Easterly argues that we in the West need to face our own history of ineptitude and draw the proper conclusions, especially at a time when the question of our ability to transplant Western institutions has become White Man's Burden: eBook ↠ one of the most pressing issues we face."/>
  • Paperback
  • 436 pages
  • The White Man's Burden: Why the West's Efforts to Aid the Rest Have Done So Much Ill and So Little Good
  • William Easterly
  • English
  • 24 September 2019
  • 0143038826

10 thoughts on “The White Man's Burden: Why the West's Efforts to Aid the Rest Have Done So Much Ill and So Little Good

  1. Nicemarmot says:

    William Easterly s poorly written challenge to Jeffrey Sachs and the global aid machine entitled, White Man s Burden, was a selection from my Global Issues and Ethics book club at the Elliot Bay book company Here is a link to an excellent review of Easterly s book www.foreignaffairs.org 2006030 I agree almost completely with the author Easterly has important points to make about accountability in global aid dispersement but his message is drowned in this book with his abuse of colleagues William Easterly s poorly written challenge to Jeffrey Sachs and the global aid machine entitled, White Man s Burden, was a selection from my Global Issues and Ethics book club at the Elliot Bay book company Here is a link to an excellent review of Easterly s book www.foreignaffairs.org 2006030 I agree almost completely with the author Easterly has important points to make about accountability in global aid dispersement but his message is drowned in this book with his abuse of colleagues that disagree with him and an overbearing push for a free market approach I gather that Easterly is a brilliant economist but I found his writing style unclear.Still, it provided a much needed introduction for me into the politics of global aid A dear friend has pointed out that many people respond better to a passionate appeal to the emotions like Easterly s book He calls for accountability in aid dispersment and for realistic, grass roots approaches to real world problems He claims that the people making the decisions at the top are too idealistic and paternal, at the risk of falling pray to Kipling s decidedly outdated, and dangerous, idea of the white man s burden He brings up a very important question What is our motivation with global aide And how best can we address global poverty

  2. Lobstergirl says:

    Breezy, yet tedious It s hard to disagree that aid agencies should be a lotaccountable than they are now, that aid projects should probably bebottom up than top down, that aid recipients should be asked what they need rather than automatically given what donor agencies have How much of aid should be market based rather than non market is vastlycomplicated and Easterly doesn t deny that But his writing style is very glib, which is unappealing It s the West and the Rest Breezy, yet tedious It s hard to disagree that aid agencies should be a lotaccountable than they are now, that aid projects should probably bebottom up than top down, that aid recipients should be asked what they need rather than automatically given what donor agencies have How much of aid should be market based rather than non market is vastlycomplicated and Easterly doesn t deny that But his writing style is very glib, which is unappealing It s the West and the Rest it s Planners bad versus Searchers good Lots of charts give a false impression of rigor Mentions of the author s children and dog are cringey, and the laugh line Savimbi was to democracy what Paris Hilton is to chastity was just misogynistic and offensive I would like to read a book that makes the same argument but withintellectual rigor

  3. Juha says:

    The New York University professor and former World Bank economist, Bill Easterly, provides a scathing critique of the grand plans to transform entire Third World societies through development aid, as promoted by academic and other luminaries such as Jeffrey Sachs and Bono, as well as by many bilateral and multilateral development agencies Building on a thorough historical analysis and deep understanding of how the development business works, Easterly convincingly argues that such utopian plans The New York University professor and former World Bank economist, Bill Easterly, provides a scathing critique of the grand plans to transform entire Third World societies through development aid, as promoted by academic and other luminaries such as Jeffrey Sachs and Bono, as well as by many bilateral and multilateral development agencies Building on a thorough historical analysis and deep understanding of how the development business works, Easterly convincingly argues that such utopian plans have never worked despite all the billions of dollars put into development aid, poverty is still rampant and many countries especially in Africa remain destitute and the Millennium Development Goals remain elusive He divides the people and organizations working in development into Planners who promote a vision of instant and complete transformations through a big bang and Searchers who seek solutions to concrete problems that actually can be solved Unlike Dambisa Moyo, whose much less sophisticated book Dead Aid received wide attention for her extreme views, William Easterly does not condemn development aid as the cause of all evil in the poor countries He sees a role for development aid, but is concerned about its effectiveness or rather the lack of it He advocates for focused aid that addresses concrete development problems facing the poor, such as health, education, roads or water He also calls for innovative ways of approaching development, especially at the local level, arguing that local people know their own problems better than planners in some faraway capital one of the last chapters is called Your Ideas Are Crazy, but Are They Crazy EnoughOne of the problems is that official development aid always goes through the government, no matter how inefficient or corrupt it is, with the result that the poor people who are intended to benefit from the aid never see any of it A Leitmotif in the book is accountability towards the intended beneficiaries, giving them what they want and need and making sure that it is delivered to them Therefore, he sees independent evaluation of aid programs as one of the most crucial solutions to ensure that aid is effective in helping those it is intended to help.The book is written in a very lively manner drawing directly from the decades of experience in Africa, Asia and Latin America that Easterly has He gives credit where credit is due, but does not spare anyone left or right from a piercing look into the motivations and results of their actions His prose is at times outraged and irreverent, often laced with humour, always well argued Everyone working in international development should read the White Man s Burden

  4. Frank Stein says:

    Overall a pretty disappointing sequel, of sorts, to his earlier The Elusive Quest for Growth Economists Adventures and Misadventures in the Tropics The latter remains one of my favorite books, examining as it does the long, convoluted history of economic thought on development and how different theories, from Rostow s Takeoff to a singular focus on population control, or education, have, when implemented, failed to lift the Third World out of poverty It was both a wonderful intellectual Overall a pretty disappointing sequel, of sorts, to his earlier The Elusive Quest for Growth Economists Adventures and Misadventures in the Tropics The latter remains one of my favorite books, examining as it does the long, convoluted history of economic thought on development and how different theories, from Rostow s Takeoff to a singular focus on population control, or education, have, when implemented, failed to lift the Third World out of poverty It was both a wonderful intellectual history and a history of how ideas have real, though in this case unfortunate, impacts on policy.This book is messier It veers all over the place, briefly discussing things like radios and TVs per capita in Africa only to start talking about safe drinking water programs It makes a too pat division between aid searchers, who try to find small solutions to poverty, and aid planners, who seek to deal with macro problems He says all successful foreign aid is premised on small solutions and all attempts to change the economic policy of poor countries are doomed to fail He is on to something here, and his discussion of how policy prescriptions that ignore the domestic conditions only provoke backlash, like IMF loans that further alienated Bolivian indigenous workers and led to five violent uprisings in that country in the early 2000s, is convincing He relates this modern reformist impulse to both the 19th century imperialist White Man s Burden and modern nation building in Iraq and Afghanistan In his universal condemnation of reform, though, he veers uncomfortably close to a sort of policy agnosticism, where there is nothing that poor countries could do on a macro level that would seriously alleviate poverty There are a few real, important takeaways from this book though One is that the poverty trap thesis of people like Jeffrey Sachs that some countries are just too poor to afford growth is just plain wrong For instance, the GDP growth per capita of the poorest fifth of countries from 1950 to the present was about the same 1.7% per annum as the world average, and a slowdown since 1985 often used as proof of the trap thesis actually proves problems with measurement, since the poorest countries in 1985 were not the same as in 1950 They weren t trapped, they became poorer because of bad policies often demanded by the West The other big point here is that there is little long term impact of any aid policies on poverty reduction Starting with the 1996 paper by LSE economist Peter Boone, there is abundant evidence that aid does not finance increased investment or growth Even the most pro aid, pro planning studies admit that after aid reaches about 8% of GDP there is a negative impact on growth as governments get divorced from their own people aid has been shown to promote evenanti democratic tendencies, dollar for dollar, than oil With aid in Africa now at around 15% of GDP, Easterly is right to point out that simply shovingmoney andbig plans at these countries will not solve their problems.So there is some worthwhile stuff here, despite the disorganization, and the book serves as a useful reminder that small, local solutions to poverty should not be dismissed by focusing only on the so called Big Picture

  5. missy jean says:

    Aren t you all so happy that now that I m in school, I can copy and paste my reading journals as goodreads reviews I ve wanted to read this book for a long time, so I was excited to get started on it The first chapter, I wasn t feeling so sure about it His introduction to global development issues seemed to be very market heavy, and I kept thinking Can we pursue this line of thinking without acknowledging the role that globalized market capitalism has played in creating the very economic i Aren t you all so happy that now that I m in school, I can copy and paste my reading journals as goodreads reviews I ve wanted to read this book for a long time, so I was excited to get started on it The first chapter, I wasn t feeling so sure about it His introduction to global development issues seemed to be very market heavy, and I kept thinking Can we pursue this line of thinking without acknowledging the role that globalized market capitalism has played in creating the very economic inequalities that we all find so reprehensible My misgivings stayed with me throughout the book, due to little details like a complimentary nod to the Chicago boys in the context of Chile s history Which is a shame, because there was a lot I liked about this book I am mostly on board with Easterly s critiques of the World Bank and IMF, and I really like his ideas about bottom up development and the importance of accountability in development work I thought Part III on colonialism and postmodern imperialism was really important However, there were a lot of places where I felt that he cursorily passed over important debates for instance, in his discussion of prostitution, or of the role of breastfeeding in HIV transmission These are important debates, far from cut and dried, and I wish he would have given them the relevant attention But the most frustrating thing about this book was its failure to critique multinational corporations with the same incisiveness that he critiques international financial institutions and governments.A couple of examples of him giving corporations a pass were two little text boxes on corporate charity On page 109, he apparently wants us to congratulate Shell for selling cook stoves in the developing world No mention, of course, about Shell s egregious human rights record complicity in oil theft, oppression of indigenous peoples, and execution of human rights activists in the Niger Delta pollution, rainforest destruction, and displacement of indigenous peoples in several countries, including Chad, Cameroon, and Peru and continued lobbying to conduct oil exploration in protected areas and delicate ecosystems, as happened in Pakistan and other places But Easterly mentions none of this he merely praises Shell s market driven approach to the problem of indoor smoke contamination AND THEN, on the very next page, Easterly segues into an apparently unironic discussion of Bolivia I was bamboozled no mention here of Shell s gas pipeline that has displaced indigenous peoples in the Chiquitano Forest in Bolivia From the World Rainforest Movement The construction of the gas pipeline between Bolivia and Brazil by the Shell and Enron petroleum companies has affected an area of 6 million hectares of Chiquitano Forest, inhabited by 178 indigenous and peasant communities This forest has been in the hands of Chiquitano and Ayoreo indigenous peoples for hundreds of years Oh, and by the way, he ends his cursory treatment of Bolivian history with a brief mention that indigenous groups are suspicious about an incipient natural gas boom driven by foreign companies Anybody who has read about the exploitation of Bolivia s natural resources by foreign companies knows that this sentence is woefully inadequate in describing the reality of the situation for Bolivians.Then on page 208, the corporate apologetic strikes again, this time complimenting Unilever s multi level marketing scheme to sell their hand soap by promoting hand washing among poor people This is a sidenote, but when I lived in Mozambique, one of my friends told me how offended he was when a bunch of white people showed up wanting to give him lessons about washing his hands He said, How stupid do you people think we are As for Unilever, I don t even know where to start with this one The company got its start by deforesting the Belgian Congo to get the palm oil used in its soaps, and its post colonial legacy continues with similar trends Monoculture crops, displaced people, deforestation, destruction of local economies, exploitative labor for subpar wages, child labor and the list goes on and on Easterly actually makes a brief but largely uncritical reference to Unilever s history in Africa on page 282, when he mentions the Tanganyika Groundnuts Scheme Though I don t think Unilever sells infant formula, it strikes me as incredibly apparently unintentionally ironic that Easterly is lauding one of the largest producers of consumer goods in the world in his section about babies dying of diarrhea Guess what s one thing that contributes to babies dying of diarrhea International and illegal formula marketing And guess what are some things that contribute to generalized global malnutrition Destruction of traditional agriculture for industrialized monocrops oh, and the flooding of local markets with international consumer goods Throughout the rest of the book, Easterly is a proponent of local, homegrown markets, and I feel like he really undermines his case by congratulating Unilever on creating a monopoly through making health claims on their imported soap in local markets in India For a book that so strongly supports local markets, there sure isn t much critical analysis of the impact of multinational corporations in the context of neoliberalism

  6. Jessica Barrett says:

    This is one of thedisturbing books I have read, in the sense that it challenged my world view and made me question my field of study at the time international development In fact, this book really steered me in another direction at a crucial time in my life, while I was in grad school at NYU where Easterly is a professor For those who work in international development, the idea that such well intentioned projects may actually doharm than good is deeply unsettling Evenso be This is one of thedisturbing books I have read, in the sense that it challenged my world view and made me question my field of study at the time international development In fact, this book really steered me in another direction at a crucial time in my life, while I was in grad school at NYU where Easterly is a professor For those who work in international development, the idea that such well intentioned projects may actually doharm than good is deeply unsettling Evenso because Easterly was an economist at the World Bank for fifteen years, so this is an insider s critique He s not critical of all development efforts He focuses mostly on the larger agencies that he says lack any feedback mechanism or accountability towards the poor they serve If you read this and Confessions of an Economic Hit Man, you may, like me, begin to harbor serious doubts about large scale development agencies

  7. Casey says:

    I have been really primed by all of the other authors in this field about what this book is about, so it is hard for me be be impartial in my review of this book That being said this book is good but I have some reservations in saying it was great At times I felt like it was a little bit insulting to my intelligence while at the same time it was interesting because of the counterarguments to traditional thinking in the development field he makes This book is almost a direct response, or count I have been really primed by all of the other authors in this field about what this book is about, so it is hard for me be be impartial in my review of this book That being said this book is good but I have some reservations in saying it was great At times I felt like it was a little bit insulting to my intelligence while at the same time it was interesting because of the counterarguments to traditional thinking in the development field he makes This book is almost a direct response, or counter argument to Jeffery Sach s The End of Poverty which argues that aid works and we needaid to make the world a better place Instead, Easterly argues that aid is another form of colonization and is in fact hurting these countries like Moyo argues in her book Dead Aid In general I think many in the field would agree with some of his arguments like the aid process should be simplified, aid is somewhat ineffective andshould be done to learn how to make iteffective, etc.One thing that I had a difficult time with is his whip lash like arguments such as Aid is bad but not always The IMF is awesome except when it sucks etc By the end of the book I was wishing he would just take a position without qualifying it and just say what he wanted to say, even if he infuriated everyone At least then he would sound likeconvincing call for reform.One thing that Easterly did a good job with was his analysis of the decolonization time period and how that history has impacted foreign policy and aid in todays world I overall recommend that any one working in the field of development, aid, or foreign policy should read this book If nothing else you will understand what all the other authors are talking about when they reference this book

  8. Tia says:

    I thought I would hate this book, because it is often trotted out by Conservatives Libertarians as an excuse to leave the developing world to its own devices and abdicate any global responsibility for the poor The book is a foil for Jeffrey Sachs cheerleaderish The End of Poverty Easterly s major argument is that Western aid efforts are often paternalistic, bureaucratic, wasteful, and counterproductive The main beneficiaries of the humanitarian industrial complex, he argues, are not the peop I thought I would hate this book, because it is often trotted out by Conservatives Libertarians as an excuse to leave the developing world to its own devices and abdicate any global responsibility for the poor The book is a foil for Jeffrey Sachs cheerleaderish The End of Poverty Easterly s major argument is that Western aid efforts are often paternalistic, bureaucratic, wasteful, and counterproductive The main beneficiaries of the humanitarian industrial complex, he argues, are not the people on the ground, but rather the cadres of aid workers and administrators that earn their bread through philanthropy That said, his point wasnuanced than don t give poor countries any money Rather, the argued for abottom up approach in which local people determine their own aid needs, develop their own organizations, and NGOs humbly give them money I can get on board with that

  9. Adrienne says:

    If you read The End of Poverty, you should read this book I love the idea of this book, which is to spend foreign aid money, however much, on individual programs that produce good results even, and perhaps especially, those programs that perform well at the individual, family, and village level That said, the writing and editing of this book leave a lot to be desired To get your effort s worth, read the introduction and the first few chapters, read the chapters at the end on successful progra If you read The End of Poverty, you should read this book I love the idea of this book, which is to spend foreign aid money, however much, on individual programs that produce good results even, and perhaps especially, those programs that perform well at the individual, family, and village level That said, the writing and editing of this book leave a lot to be desired To get your effort s worth, read the introduction and the first few chapters, read the chapters at the end on successful programs, and skim everything in between The book is ridiculously redundant

  10. shaw says:

    Found this on my friend s bookshelf in Lima From what I remember of Malcolm Gladwell s Tipping Point I read a few chapters at a book store cafe a while back , Easterly has a similar approach of simplifying a complex phenomena by coining terms here, Planners and Seekers and employing a ton of analogies like every other paragraph to make his argumentaccessible to a larger audience He also repeats emphasizes his points a lot, perhaps for the same reason. which I found a little annoyin Found this on my friend s bookshelf in Lima From what I remember of Malcolm Gladwell s Tipping Point I read a few chapters at a book store cafe a while back , Easterly has a similar approach of simplifying a complex phenomena by coining terms here, Planners and Seekers and employing a ton of analogies like every other paragraph to make his argumentaccessible to a larger audience He also repeats emphasizes his points a lot, perhaps for the same reason. which I found a little annoying.As I started reading, at first I had a negative reaction to his choice for the title, to say the least, which references a particular poem As much as I sort of understand he s pointing out the West s view of itself as a savior and how that s problematic, I feel that he sees it as a problem only because that approach has proven not to work for example, in alleviating poverty , but not because it sthan a philosophy but perhaps a reflection of a larger system of blind privilege, racism, classism, etc that still affects people s living condition today.Once I got over all that though, I agree with his points people trying to do good need to stop coming up with self conceived change it all plans people know their own lives and communities best and should be supported in finding their own solutions clearly defined and achievable goals accountability and feedback evaluation It was refreshing to hear this from the perspective of an economist who spent 15 yrs at the World Bank How many economists talk about colonialism He also takes it right to Jeffrey Sachs and The End of Poverty, in his criticisms Nice.I think it s a great reading rec for people involved in policy, aid, and service work, as hopefully a conversation starter or added perspective, especially for those who unintentionally have a top down approach It s only a starting point though It s pretty clear that while Easterly has a great perspective, I don t think he knows how to make his suggested approach a reality, especially being an economist eg, how do you determine individual community needs and solutions as proposed by local individuals what do you do if they are conflicting accounts and so on

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