G�ologie Et R�v�lation, Ou Histoire Ancienne de la Terre: Consid�r�e a la Lumi�re Des Faits G�ologiques Et de la Religion R�v�l�e (Classic Reprint)

G�ologie Et R�v�lation, Ou Histoire Ancienne de la Terre: Consid�r�e a la Lumi�re Des Faits G�ologiques Et de la Religion R�v�l�e (Classic Reprint)❰EPUB❯ ✰ G�ologie Et R�v�lation, Ou Histoire Ancienne de la Terre: Consid�r�e a la Lumi�re Des Faits G�ologiques Et de la Religion R�v�l�e (Classic Reprint) Author Gerald Molloy – Heartforum.co.uk Excerpt from G ologie Et R v lation, ou Histoire Ancienne de la Terre Consid r e A la Lumi re des Faits G ologiques Et de la Religion R v l eLe progr s de la science moderne a donn lieu a un grand nom Excerpt from G ologie R�v�lation, Ou PDF/EPUB » Et R v lation, ou Histoire Ancienne de la Terre Consid r e A la Lumi re des Faits G ologiques Et de la Religion R v l eLe progr s de la science moderne a donn lieu a un grand nombre d objections contre les v rit s r v l es Mais de toutes les obj ections dont s est mu l esprit publie en An G�ologie Et eBook ä gleterre et en g n ral dans toute l europe, celles qui l ont frapp le plus vivement se d duisent des int ressantes d couvertes de la G ologie Aussi lorsque je fus amen il y a quelques ann es Entreprendre la d fense de la religion r v l e, je me rencontrai face face avec les ph nom nes et avec les sp culations g ologiquesAbout the PublisherForgotten books publishes Et R�v�lation, Ou PDF È hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books Find at forgottenbooksThis book is a reproduction of an important historical work Forgotten books uses state of the art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.

Is a well known R�v�lation, Ou PDF/EPUB » author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the G�ologie Et R�v�lation, Ou Histoire Ancienne de la Terre: Consid�r�e a la Lumi�re Des Faits G�ologiques Et de la Religion R�v�l�e Classic Reprint book, this is one of the most wanted Gerald Molloy author readers around the world.

G�ologie Et R�v�lation, Ou Histoire Ancienne de la
    Import EPUB to the Program Import EPUB the art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works."/>
  • Hardcover
  • 518 pages
  • G�ologie Et R�v�lation, Ou Histoire Ancienne de la Terre: Consid�r�e a la Lumi�re Des Faits G�ologiques Et de la Religion R�v�l�e (Classic Reprint)
  • Gerald Molloy
  • 14 April 2018
  • 0364533242

3 thoughts on “G�ologie Et R�v�lation, Ou Histoire Ancienne de la Terre: Consid�r�e a la Lumi�re Des Faits G�ologiques Et de la Religion R�v�l�e (Classic Reprint)

  1. Paul Robinson says:

    Why would you read a book that is 150 years old, much less review it, especially when it is partially about science Well, Forgotten Books points out that they reprint writings that are historically important If any book is still in print after a century and a half, then it must have an intrinsic worth.For one thing, this work by Irish priest Fr Gerald Molloy is a fair representation of the authentic response of the Catholic mind to the explosive findings of geology in the 19th century What Why would you read a book that is 150 years old, much less review it, especially when it is partially about science Well, Forgotten Books points out that they reprint writings that are historically important If any book is still in print after a century and a half, then it must have an intrinsic worth.For one thing, this work by Irish priest Fr Gerald Molloy is a fair representation of the authentic response of the Catholic mind to the explosive findings of geology in the 19th century What was that response The answer is provided in the preface to the American edition of this work, written in 1870 Reviewing the progress of opinion touching the relations of Science to Revealed Religion, it is noteworthy that while many Protestant theologians and writers on both sides of the Atlantic have, until a recent period, treated the discoveries of science, and especially of Geology, so far as they affect theological dogmas, in a manner, if not of contempt, at least of distrust or unfairness on the contrary, the Romanist writers who have discussed these themes, have done so, generally, in a spirit of broad catholicity well calculated to command the respect it merits They have shown no sensitiveness or timidity lest, perchance, their exegesis might be disturbed by candidly admitting the changes demanded by the discoveries of Science p 11 My own studies have confirmed this statement in spades, and Geology and Revelation is just a new addition to a long list of references to Catholic broadmindedness in manifesting the agreement between the Bible and science, not by denying science s legitimate discoveries, but by showing their compatibility with a correct interpretation of Scripture.Mr Hugh Owen of the Kolbe Center once accused Fr Fulcran Vigouroux, of the Pontifical Biblical Commission, of being intoxicated with his confidence in the truth of the wild speculations of Lyellian geology On this score, Fr Molloy is likewise in a state of inebriation, and probably further under the table than the learned assistant of St Pius X.In what ways does Fr Molloy agree with Sir Charles Lyell In several he refers to two works of Lyell as being classic in 1869 , he thanks Lyell for allowing him to reproduce some of the drawings that embellish his works and, most importantly, he wholeheartedly adopts Lyell s principle of uniformitarianism The word as such is never used, yet the notion of uniformitarianism reappears again and again, for instance on pages 47, 88, 117 119, 126, and 279 Here is how he explains the principle on page 47 In the physical sciences it is a common principle of reasoning to account for the phenomena that come before us in nature, by the operation of natural causes which we know to exist Nay, this principle seems to be almost an instinct of our nature, which guides even the least philosophical amidst us, in the common affairs of life.Here is an example of his application of this principle, on page 117 As the stream of water flows down the slopes of the hill, a thin layer of Travertine rock is produced on the surface of the earth, almost before our eyes and so it was previous to our own time, and so it has been for ages, as history and tradition testify The quantity produced in each year and in each century is comparatively small, but we can have no doubt that it has been produced by the means described Now, beneath the surface of the Earth, immediately below these modern formations, of which we have so clearly ascertained the origin, we find strata of the same kind, composed of the same materials, and arranged in the same way, layer resting upon layer, down to a depth of two hundred feet and the Geologist accounts for the formation of the one according to the same laws which he has seen at work in the production of the other.None of Fr Molloy s charming Irish prose has any difficulty with this process of scientific reasoning, nor does he see any threat to the faith from it whatsoever It is rather the opposite he has no time for anyone who argues that geological formations were not built up by natural processes over long periods of time, but rather were just created directly by God He points out that we would never use such reasoning if we were gazing at the ruins of an old castle It is true that God is Omnipotent He might, if it had so pleased Him, have built the old castle at the creation of the world, and allowed it to crumble slowly into ruins or he might have built it yesterday, and made a ruin begin to be where no castle had stood before and covered the stones with moss, and mantled the walls in ivy All this is true but yet if any one were to argue in this style against us, he would fail to shake our convictions we should still unhesitatingly believe that human hands once built the castle p 48 The uniformitarian reasoning of the geologists, then, is not at all unreasonable In the second half of his book, when he considers revelation, after having considered science in the first half, Fr Molloy goes even further At that point, I already knew that Fr Molloy and I were kindred spirits, geeky priest scientist types who are as sensitive to the rights of reason as those of revelation, and who want to communicate that balance to the faithful But it was really when I came to page 282 that I discovered how astonishing can be one s feeling of seeing eye to eye with someone whom one has certainly never seen with physical eyes, but can only use written words as a means to encounter and get to know the person It was there that Fr Molloy expressed the same theological reservations that I have about Young Earth Creationism it would involve God in deceiving us, and it is not reasonable to hold that we have such a God.In the context, Fr Molloy is relating how fossil evidence demonstrates that the Earth is likely millions of years old The creationists of his time, to get around this, claimed that God created the fossils ex nihilo Here is Fr Molloy s answer Absolute metaphysical certainty about the geological evidence we have not but we have a firm and rational conviction We feel quite satisfied that the great Creator of the Universe did not bring suddenly into existence the withered remains and broken fragments of animals which had never lived that He did not stamp upon the massive rocks, buried in the profound recesses of the earth, the impress of a luxuriant vegetation which had never flourished that He did not, in short, create under millions of forms, the delusive appearances of things which had never been, and scatter them through this world of ours in wild profusion, well knowing that after many centuries they would come to light to bewilder human reason, and to lead it into error.But this book has manybenefits to its credit besides the fact that it agrees with me The first section, which provides a thorough tour of geological science, is readable and fascinating Fr Molloy is very knowledgeable in his subject and he has the art of effortless communication He provides the reader general principles, topics that are clearly separated one from another, and many concrete illustrations from human history of the phenomena he describes.The second section showcases Fr Molloy s exegetical skill He exhaustively considers the teaching of the Fathers, the scholastic theologians of the Middle Ages, and the Counter Reformation theologians on the subject of the meaning of day in Genesis 1 He points out that the opinion of the Fathers on the subject was quite diverse, a remark that is worth quoting No one who will take the trouble to investigate, with any reasonable diligence and research, the nature of the Mosaic Days, can fail to be struck with the remarkable diversity of opinion that existed on the subject among the Fathers of the Church Yet this diversity of opinion is often overlooked by modern writers They fancy that the meaning of the word Day is so plain as to leave no room for doubt or controversy that a day can be nothing else than a period of twenty four hours, marked by the succession of light and darkness and that in this sense the Mosaic narrative was universally understood until quite recently, when a new explanation was invented, to meet the requirements of modern science All this is far from true The meaning of the Mosaic Days has been, in point of fact, a subject of controversy from the earliest times pp 318 319 This enables Fr Molloy to argue, as Fr Vigouroux also argued, that he is not departing from the spirit of the Fathers by understanding day means as an indefinite period of time Once , Fr Molloy treats this topic with great thoroughness and mastery, considering all possible objections to his opinion and even descending to the analysis of the Hebrew words used for day , evening , and morning He proposes that God created the universe and the earth at some time before the six days The days themselves indicate certain stages in the development of the earth.The appearance of light corresponds to the time when the vapor surrounding the Earth thinned out, allowing the rays of the sun through The formation of the Earth s crust is day two Then, there is the appearance of plants on day three On day four, the atmosphere clears sufficiently for the sun, moon and stars to be actually seen Finally, days 5 and 6 can easily be reconciled with what the layers of the geological record shows us about the appearance of animals and man the technical name for this manner of matching science with Scripture is called concordism If I cited all of the passages of the book that I would like from this most quotable book, this review would run on to an indefinite and no doubtunwieldy length Let these suffice, then, to provide the reader with a taste of the author s style and views In my own mind, it is an extraordinary testimony to Fr Molloy s accomplishment that his book is still in print after the passage of so much geological and astronomical time It could almost be used as a study guide for today s Catholics on things geological and exegetical, and is certainly a most useful resource for steering Catholics away from the temptations of Protestant fundamentalist exegesis Tolle et lege.

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