Queering Black Atlantic Religions: Transcorporeality in Candomblé, Santería, and Vodou

Queering Black Atlantic Religions: Transcorporeality in Candomblé, Santería, and Vodou❴PDF / Epub❵ ✅ Queering Black Atlantic Religions: Transcorporeality in Candomblé, Santería, and Vodou Author Roberto Strongman – Heartforum.co.uk In Queering Black Atlantic Religions Roberto Strongman examines Haitian Vodou, Cuban Lucum Santer a, and Brazilian Candombl to demonstrate how religious rituals of trance possession allow humans to un In Queering Black Atlantic Religions Atlantic Religions: eBook ✓ Roberto Strongman examines Haitian Vodou, Cuban Lucum Santer a, and Brazilian Candombl to demonstrate how religious rituals of trance possession allow humans to understand themselves as embodiments of the divine In these rituals, the commingling of humans and the divine produces gender identities that are independent of biological sex As opposed to the Cartesian view of the spirit as locked within the body, the body in Queering Black ePUB × Afro diasporic religions is an open receptacle Showing how trance possession is a primary aspect of almost all Afro diasporic cultural production, Strongman articulates transcorporeality as a black, trans Atlantic understanding of the human psyche, soul, and gender as multiple, removable, and external to the body.

Is a well known author, Atlantic Religions: eBook ✓ some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the Queering Black Atlantic Religions: Transcorporeality in Candomblé, Santería, and Vodou book, this is one of the most wanted Roberto Strongman author readers around the world.

Queering Black Atlantic Religions: Transcorporeality in
  • Paperback
  • 296 pages
  • Queering Black Atlantic Religions: Transcorporeality in Candomblé, Santería, and Vodou
  • Roberto Strongman
  • 05 July 2017
  • 1478003103

10 thoughts on “Queering Black Atlantic Religions: Transcorporeality in Candomblé, Santería, and Vodou

  1. Morgan M. Page says:

    Enter the igbodu, Roberto Strongman invites us in his new book Queering Black Atlantic Religions Transcorporeality in Candombl , Santer a, and Vodou The book attempts to use the igbodu, the initiatory chamber of Lukum Santer a and other Yor b derived inspired faiths, as a stylistic container in mirror both to the religions themselves and to his central idea of transcorporeality This term refers not to trans embodiment, as any reader of queer and gender studies might assume, but to a new Enter the igbodu, Roberto Strongman invites us in his new book Queering Black Atlantic Religions Transcorporeality in Candombl , Santer a, and Vodou The book attempts to use the igbodu, the initiatory chamber of Lukum Santer a and other Yor b derived inspired faiths, as a stylistic container in mirror both to the religions themselves and to his central idea of transcorporeality This term refers not to trans embodiment, as any reader of queer and gender studies might assume, but to a new way of conceptualizing the body of initiates in Afro Diasporic religions not as singular personhoods being invaded through possession, but rather as concave receptacles for multiple personhood, rejecting the Western philosophical positions on the subject.Strongman elucidates the concept of transcorporeality through the three most widely researched Afro Diasporic religions Haitian Vodou, Cuban Lukum Santer a, and Brazilian Candombl Where this book is particularly strong, and stands out among Afro Atlantic religious studies texts, is Strongman s engagement with multiple languages By the end of the book, you truly wonder if there are any languages Strongman can t speak, given that Spanish, Portuguese, French, Haitian Kreyol, German, and Italian are all brought in at various points throughout.But puzzlingly, Strongman seems not to have put these languages to much use beyond reading and translating ethnographies, novels, and films Despite almost sharing a title with the earlier Queering Creole Spiritual Traditions, which the present book references, Queering Black Atlantic Religions couldn t be further from such sociological and ethnographic material This book instead focuseson literary criticism than it does on the actual practice of the religions being referenced As a result, we walk away from the book not with anuanced understanding of the religions, but rather a grappling with the previous scholars in the field.Even that engagement, though, is full of surprising analytic omissions For example, in the chapter of Wifredo Lam, Strongman rightly pushes back against the previous critical tradition of de Africanizing Lam and de emphasizing the role of Lukum in his work Simultaneously, Strongman himself gives no engagement with Lam s Chinese heritage, nor any discussion at all of the Afro Chinese community in Cuba and its relationship to Lukum religion and aesthetics a troubling omissions given the extremely interesting work of Dr Martin Tsang on this subject.The most glaring omission throughout the entire book, though, is the almost total absence of discussion of trans people within Afro Atlantic religions Strongman s queer does not encompass these subjects, though it makes room alongside gay cis men for sex workers, spirits, spirit mediums, bigamy, and anyone doing non procreative sex essentially refiguring many straight people as queer subjects Actual trans people receive only a brief mention in the chapters on Candombl , but this mention consists of a Kulick quote that incorrectly downplays the level of participation they have within these religions While this bothers me as a trans practitioner of one of the religions studied, it s also just a bit of a bizarre missed opportunity given that so much of the book speculates on the role of cross gender identification in spirit possession And this cannot be attributed to a lack of existing scholarship for Strongman to engage with, given that there are multiple documentaries and books on the subject, one of which Strongman quotes fromthan once the aforementioned Queering Creole Spiritual Traditions.We can t fault the book for not doing things it never intended to do, but one does wonder why Strongman appears to have not bothered to speak to any of his informants about the ideas he is working through The ethnographic sections of this book don t amount to much of anything, particularly in the Santer a Lukum section where they could simply be excised and no difference would be made to the text In the final chapter on Candombl , there is some interesting fieldwork around Candombl in Portugal, but there isn t much that comes out of it beyond Strongman s theorizing about the introduction of Candombl to a mostly white European audience Whereas the scholars whom Strongman both depends on and criticizes Lydia Cabrera, Maya Deren, Pierre Verger, Hubert Fichte, etc drew their conclusions from interviews with practitioners and participation in ceremonies, Strongman instead draws much of his from popular film depictions.We exit the book as an ushering out of the igbod , dreamy, yet awake, though much like the new initiate while we leave this womb like environment changed, we do so without much new knowledge.In total, this a book that requires a fairly vast knowledge of existing scholarship on Vodou, Santer a Lukum , and Candombl to keep up with And while there are some interesting ideas, it s omissions and seeming lack of engagement with living practitioners undermines what could have been a much deeper discussion

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