London Made Us: A Memoir of a Shape-Shifting City




      London Made Us: A Memoir of a Shape-Shifting City
London is a giant kaleidoscope, which is forever turning Take your eye off it for than a moment and you re lost Robert Elms has seen London change beyond all imagining the house he grew up in is now the behemoth that is the Westway flyover, and areas once deemed murder miles have morphed into the stuff of estate agents dreams, seemingly in a matter of months.Elms takes us back through time and place to myriad Londons He is our guide through a place that has seen scientific experiments conducted in subterranean lairs, a small community declare itself an independent nation and animals of varying exoticism roam free through its streets a place his great great grandfather made the Elms home over a century ago and a city that has borne witness to epoch and world changing events. Read London Made Us: A Memoir of a Shape-Shifting City – heartforum.co.uk

Robert Elms is a British writer and broadcaster Elms was a writer for The Face magazine in the 1980s and is currently known for his long running radio show on BBC London 94.9 His book The Way We Wore, charts the changing fashions of his own youth, linking them with the social history of the times.

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      London Made Us: A Memoir of a Shape-Shifting City
 Kindle Author Robert Elms ↠ southern war for independance – heartforum.co.uk
  • Hardcover
  • 320 pages
  • London Made Us: A Memoir of a Shape-Shifting City
  • Robert Elms
  • English
  • 01 February 2017
  • 1786892111

10 thoughts on “ London Made Us: A Memoir of a Shape-Shifting City

  1. Bernard O& says:

    I feel great affinity with Robert Elms This may be because I listen to him on BBC Radio London most days It may be because we re both the same age It may be that both of us are at Loftus Road for most QPR home games Or it may be a sense of shared roots.So, plenty of connections But also, it has to be said, plenty of differences Robert Elms is a very sharp dresser I m not He is very cool and very connected I am neither He is a Londoner born and bred I may live there now in Barnes, an I feel great affinity with Robert Elms This may be because I listen to him on BBC Radio London most days It may be because we re both the same age It may be that both of us are at Loftus Road for most QPR home games Or it may be a sense of shared roots.So, plenty of connections But also, it has to be said, plenty of differences Robert Elms is a very sharp dresser I m not He is very cool and very connected I am neither He is a Londoner born and bred I may live there now in Barnes, an area for which Elms can never disguise his contempt but, after a Woking birth, my childhood and adolescence was spent in Surrey.Elms was brought up in Burnt Oak, far closer to the heart of London than Surrey, but still distant enough to make him feel marginalised, and sympathetic to others in the same boat I think Paul Weller, a man of similar age, attitude and attire, whom I admire enormously and whose London family were exiled even further, to Woking, carries a similar burden.And that s anoth...

  2. Nighean Walker says:

    I could hear Robert s voice throughout this book, being an avid listener to his BBC Radio London radio show The book is a gentle ramble through his family s past in the city but I must admit I was hopi...

  3. Mike Clarke says:

    Blitzed kid Robert Elms s paean to his home town veers occasionally into Maybe it s becawse a I m a Londoner sentimentality, though mostly he keeps this in Prince of Wales check Elms burnished his credentials as a pop social historian with The Way We Wore, which was basically him flicking through the contents of his wardrobes whilst telling stories, and London Made Us is cut of much the same cloth.This works for me and maybe others too because I m from here I can remember at infant scho Blitzed kid Robert Elms s paean to his home town veers occasionally into Maybe it s becawse...

  4. Derek Humphreys says:

    There was so much in this book which was familiar to me I became a Londoner when I came to London at the age of 16 I lived in a grotty staff hostel in Gants Hill and worked in a horrible job in Walthamstow It was 1968 and I was both excited an scared shitless I quickly changed jobs, spending the next 10 years working in Piccadilly at Fortnums and managing a shop in Old Compton St The places and faces Robert described were exactly as I saw them Maybe I rememberabout the clubs and pubs There was so much in this book which was familiar to me I became a Londoner when I came to London at the age of 16 I lived in a grotty staff hostel in Gants Hill and worked in a horrible job in Walthamstow It was 1968 and I was both excited an scared shitless I quickly changed jobs, spending the next 10 years working in Piccadilly at Fortnums and managing a shop in...

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