Companion To Marx's Capital (Vol 1 and 2), A: The Complete Edition: 1-2



Companion To Marx's Capital (Vol 1 and 2), A: The Complete Edition: 1-2The Radical Geographer Guides Us Through The Classic Text Of Political Economy My Aim Is To Get You To Read A Book By Karl Marx Called Capital, Volume 1, And To Read It On Marx S Own Terms The Biggest Financial Crisis Since The Great Depression Has Generated A Surge Of Interest In Marx S Work In The Effort To Understand The Origins Of Our Current Predicament For Nearly Forty Years, David Harvey Has Written And Lectured On Capital, Becoming One Of The World S Most Foremost Marx Scholars Based On His Recent Lectures, This Current Volume Aims To Bring This Depth Of Learning To A Broader Audience, Guiding First Time Readers Through A Fascinating And Deeply Rewarding Text A Companion To Marx S Capital Offers Fresh, Original And Sometimes Critical Interpretations Of A Book That Changed The Course Of History And, As Harvey Intimates, May Do So Again.

David Harvey born 1935 is the Distinguished Professor of Anthropology at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York CUNY A leading social theorist of international standing, he graduated from University of Cambridge with a PhD in Geography in 1961 He is the world s most cited academic geographer according to Andrew Bodman, see Transactions of the IBG, 1991,1992 , and the author of many books and essays that have been prominent in the development of modern geography as a discipline His work has contributed greatly to broad social and political debate, most recently he has been credited with helping to bring back social class and Marxist methods as serious methodological tools in the critique of global capitalism, particularly in its neoliberal form.

[PDF / Epub] ☄ Companion To Marx's Capital (Vol 1 and 2), A: The Complete Edition: 1-2 Author David Harvey – Heartforum.co.uk
  • Kindle Edition
  • 752 pages
  • Companion To Marx's Capital (Vol 1 and 2), A: The Complete Edition: 1-2
  • David Harvey
  • 11 March 2017

10 thoughts on “Companion To Marx's Capital (Vol 1 and 2), A: The Complete Edition: 1-2

  1. Trevor says:

    I was recommended to read this by a friend here on goodreads There is an online video course thing that Harvey does too he has been teaching his course on Capital for 40 years or something and when he put the course online as a series of video lectures he was asked if he would also write a companion book this book to those lectures The course is available here ve written my review of Capital but this book I was recommended to read this by a friend here on goodreads There is an online video course thing that Harvey does too he has been teaching his course on Capital for 40 years or something and when he put the course online as a series of video lectures he was asked if he would also write a companion book this book to those lectures The course is available here ve written my review of Capital but this book is obviously better than my review was ever likely to be Not least since Harvey has read hundreds of timesabout Capital than I m ever likely to And he has read all of the source material too, something else I would do if I had, you know, six or seven lifetimes ahead of me, rather than whatever meagre few years it is I have left of this one.I m not going to go into lots of detail But I do need to mention some of the things I learnt from this One of the things I tell people I would have put on my headstone, if it was up to me, which of course it isn t, is He never was all that good with the obvious If there is one phrase that couldor less sum up my life, that would probably be it So, when Harvey said that part of what Marx was trying to do in the first volume of Capital was to show even if you were to take the most pro Capitalist assumptions as if they were gospel, that even then Capitalism would inevitably become trapped in its own contradictions Nope, don t think I actually understood that was what he was doing when I read it I got that Capitalism would become entrapped in its own contradictions from my reading, but didn t notice that he was restricting himself so as not to challenge the kinds of assumptions that people like Adam Smith or Ricardo would have felt quite happy supporting This is, I think, an incredibly interesting and important way to criticise something that is, on its own terms And as important as it is, it is also almost never actually done that way People are all too happy to say your ideas are rubbish on the basis that they are different from their ideas but while it is easy to point out such differences, it is much harder to show why your ideas ought to be givenweight than the other person s ideas So, starting with their ideas as if they were right and true, and then letting those ideas play out on their own terms and thus show their internal contradictions is a remarkably interesting and powerful thing to do.This book also gives a really good introduction to what Marx called his dialectical method This is very helpful, particularly if you are ever going to get over the first few chapters of Capital which even Marx said were ridiculously difficult to read and should perhaps be skipped over and read later The point of his method is to show that you can t approach a subject as if it was made up of a series of dead statues all standing in a row, but rather you can only understand a subject if you can observe it in its life , that is, as the interplay of relationships in lived experience One of the things the author repeatedly discusses is the relationship Marx poses between the apparent and the actual relationships that exist within Capitalism He means that when you first see some feature of capitalism, it appears to be working in one way, but that Marx wasn t content with describing this apparent something, but rather tried to look beyond appearances to what was going on underneath Now, everyone says that they are doing something like that However, this was effectively Marx s method He would talk about some apparent feature of capitalism say, that prices are fixed by the laws of supply and demand and then move away from this concrete appearance to see if he could find auniversal rule underlying it the labour theory of value, say and then come back to the concrete world to show how this new and less apparent underlying feature both made the first concrete view seem obvious, but also how this new understanding also gives a richer and deeper understanding of concrete phenomena Look, I suspect that is all too hard to really understand the point is that part of Marx s method is to present an idea as if it is the whole truth but then to show how this idea can t really explain all of the things it set out to explain so, then he has to propose a deeper, less obvious truth that underlies this apparent truth, and that both explains the old idea but also shows why it was limited, why the new idea isn t so limited and how the new truth leads to deeper insights as well, insights that the apparent truth simply could not explain This process is followed throughout and Harvey points out when Marx is doing this repeatedly along the way.The other thing Harvey does is to link Marx s ideas back or forward, I guess to current problems of Capitalism, particularly post 2008 Capitalism and how Marx s ideas predicted these problems These, too, are very powerful sections of this book and useful as many of the examples Marx himself uses are so old to us now that we can struggle to see what is the point of his examples Which is the other thing this book does very well, that is, provide some of the historical context to things that are incredibly important to Marx, but hardly register at all to us Things like the changes of the Corn Laws or the impact the Chartists made For this alone, I would recommend using this book as a companion if you are thinking of reading the first volume of Capital.Harvey has also written a companion to the second volume of Capital eventually I will get around to reading both that book and the second volume itself But not for a while, I m afraid.Look, any book on economics is hard going and Marx is hard work too, particularly since he wrote Capital ages ago which means that many of his references, literary allusions and historical context itself are often quite obscure to us all this time later So, a book like this, one that does the work of explaining these in a readable style, really is damn helpful

  2. Ian "Marvin" Graye says:

    The Value of Time and CapitalThe down time provided by the coronavirus lockdown has been a good opportunity for some reading that would otherwise have been time consuming, challenging or intimidating So I finally got around to reading this guide to Karl Marx most important economic work, if not yetCapitalitself.This is a fairly thorough companion to a reading of volume I ofCapital. I haven t consciously tried to assess the extent to which it reflects Marx s analysis accurately To do The Value of Time and CapitalThe down time provided by the coronavirus lockdown has been a good opportunity for some reading that would otherwise have been time consuming, challenging or intimidating So I finally got around to reading this guide to Karl Marx most important economic work, if not yetCapitalitself.This is a fairly thorough companion to a reading of volume I ofCapital. I haven t consciously tried to assess the extent to which it reflects Marx s analysis accurately To do that, I d have to read the primary work which I haven t yet However, my intuitive response is that it is based on a thorough reading and understanding of the primary work.At the same time, it attempts to extrapolate Marx analysis into the twenty first century, as well as determinewhat is to be doneto achieve a society and economy that remedies the flaws of capitalism as Marx described them in the nineteenth century.Marx Theory of ValueMy ultimate aim was to get a critical understanding of the role of labour in Marx value theory often called the labour theory of value This theory is based on a critique of the theory of Adam Smith.Marx believes that commodities are the material bearers of exchange value in contrast to use value.Use value is subjective, personal or idiosyncratic It s the driver of the consumer s desire to acquire commodities In contrast, exchange value is social or collective It s a value imposed on commodities from the outside It isn t intrinsic to the specific commodity.Exchange value is a measure of the relative value of commodities their commensurability.Commensurability requires a basis for comparison Although Marx doesn t discuss money until later in the work, it is obviously a measure of value that allows people to compare and contrast the relative value of commodities.Products of Human LabourIn the absence of money as a measure, Marx says,if then we disregard the use value of commodities, only one property remains that being that they are products of human labour Harvey extrapolates,what commodities have in common is that they are all bearers of the human labour embodied in their production Marx says thatwhat exclusively determines the magnitude of the value of any article is therefore the amount of labour socially necessary, or the labour time socially necessary for its production Social Value Congealed in the CommodityHuman labour is a process of transformation of raw materials Labour is transformativeHuman labour is a tangible process, but at the end of the process, you get this thing a commodity which coagulates or congeals value Exchange value is not an objective property of the commodity itself It represents the social value of the commodity, different from its physical or sensuous quality The system which allows the exchange of commodities at the market and the use of money to measure value disguise the real social relations between the traders the seller and the buyer i.e., the people rather than the things This process of disguise is what Marx calls the fetishism of the commodity The seller and the buyer who come into contact with each other are the bearers or personification of economic relations.Socially Necessary Labour TimeHuman labour is not the actual subjective time taken to manufacture the commodity It refers tohuman labour in the abstract.This measure of value refers tosocially necessary labour time , which isthe labour time required to produce any use value under the conditions of production normal for a given society and with the average degree of skill and intensity of labour prevalent in that society As an example, if a shirt took an average worker one day to make, whereas a pair of shoes took the same worker two days, then the pair of shoes is worth twice as much as the shirt.This comparison of value is obviously easier once money is used For example, the shirt might be worth 150, and the shoes 300 Money is aprecise measure than labour.The Origin of MoneyMarx uses the concept of exchange value to explain the origin of the money form Money allows the trade or sale of a commodity to move beyond the barter of two types of commodity Money is theuniversal equivalentof exchange value It also replaces precious metals like gold and silver Money appears in thesocial relation between commodity and commodity. Money becomes a commodity that facilitates the exchange of other commodities Money becomes a money commodity The money commodity isthe measure of value as the social incarnation of human labour Fluctuations in supply and demand achieve an equilibrium price, which isa convergence on the average social labour necessary to produce a commodity.Surplus ValueThe process of exchange or circulation results in an increase or increment in exchange valuethe value originally advancednot only remains intact while in circulation, but increases its magnitude, adds to itself a surplus value, or is valorizedAnd this movement converts it into capital Harvey explains thatCapital is not a thing, but a process a process, specifically, of the circulation of values These values are congealed in different things at various points in the process in the first instance, as money, and then as commodity before turning back into the money formM C M The aim of a capitalist isthe unceasing movement of profit making Harvey adds,Capital is, therefore, value in motionit s valorization is self valorization Itlays golden eggsValue therefore now becomes value in process, money in process, and, as such, capital Money therefore forms the starting point and the conclusion of every valorization process Capital is a means of making stillmoney out of money The Value of Labour PowerMarx posits that,in its pure form, the circulation process necessitates the exchange of equivalents This gives rise to a problem for the creation of surplus valueThe formation of surplus value cannot be explained by assuming that commodities are sold above their valueor are bought at less than their valueTo solve the problem, Marx builds on the concept of labour power which he argues is the only commodity with the capacity to create value.The capitalist buys the worker s labour power for the value of the means of subsistence necessary for the maintenance of the worker.What Workers Make and GetMarx s solution is therefore thatsurplus value originates from the difference between what labour gets for its labour power as a commodity, and what the labourer produces in a labour process under the command of capital Harvey concludes that capitalists milkthe gap between what labour gets and the value that labour makes The most obvious example of this gap is where a worker is paid for eight hours per day, but works for ten hours surplus labour for no additional wages or overtime In effect, the worker contributes two additional hours of value to the capitalist per day.https www.rimini protokoll.de websiUsurpation of the Worker s TimeValue is socially necessary labour time, which means that the capitalist gets the value of the additional labour time without having to pay for itCapital usurps the time for the worker s growth, development and healthy maintenance of the bodyIn other words, the capitalist converts some or all of the worker s leisure time into unpaid labour time, and therefore into surplus value for the capitalist The worker s life time is transformed into working time Multiple Contributors of ValueDespite Marx views, it doesn t necessarily follow from this analysis that labour is the only contributor to value, surplus value or profit The exchange value of a commodity might derive from a number of value contributors or inputs, e.g., labour, raw materials, land, power, intellectual property This is a premise of modern cost accounting Thus, profit derived from the sale of the commodity by an employer is not necessarily an expropriation of the labour value of an employee s contribution to the exchange value of the commodity.Where there are other value contributors or inputs e.g., raw materials , it doesn t seem to be appropriate to compare the exchange value of two commodities solely on the basis of labour time.For example, a diamond ring will reflect the value of both the jeweller s labour and skill, and the value of the underlying diamond which partly reflects the scarcity of diamonds Marx would say that at least part of the value of the diamond reflects the labour cost of mining it, as well as the value of the historical labour required to generate the profit to fund its purchase.Multiple Contributors of Surplus ValueMarx appears to have argued that only labour could generate surplus value, that in effect none of the other inputs into the commodity were responsible for the surplus value or profit.This argument seems to be a scientific conclusion justified by a political bias or persuasion.On the other hand, it could equally be reached by arguing that the other inputs are ultimately funded by historical, past ordead labourthat is stored in capital the capital that already exists and funds the acquisition of the other inputs as well as labour power.Marx argues thatliving labourawakens or reanimatesdead labourfrom the dead Dead labour isbathed in the fire of labourLabour transforms raw materials and past labourthe lifeless constituents of a productinto a commodity, because it is aform giving fire Capital is dead labourWhich, vampire like,Lives only by suckingLiving labour,And lives the ,Thelabour it sucks However, if the capitalist paid the worker for all of the time worked, it could be argued that the historical surplus value legitimately belonged to the capitalist.Marx the PolemicistUltimately, Marx conclusion promotes the political objectives of the working class, by suggesting that they have not been adequately remunerated for the labour they contribute to the process of creating a commodity On a best case basis, labour should be entitled to the whole of the surplus value which would deprive the capitalist of the commercial purpose of their enterprise the desire to make a profit on their capital capital accumulation , which would or could have been re invested in the enterprise This would also reduce the ability of the capitalist to pay interest on borrowed capital, as well as the ability to reward the assumption of enterprise risk with respect to their capital Alternatively, labour should at least be entitled to a proportionate share of the surplus value, or a share after deduction of interest and or a reasonable return on investment Another solution would be to increase wages proportionately to reflect the value of the additional time worked This would allow the capitalist to retain ownership or property in the surplus value.Exploitation and Alienation of the WorkerHarvey explains these arguments by reference to the Lockean principle thatproperty rights accrue to those who create value by mixing their labour with the land The workers are the ones who produced the surplus value, and by rights it should belong to them This would have the result that the golden eggs laid by the capitalist goose belong not to the goose, but to the worker.If they belong to the capitalist, it means thatthe worker himself constantly produces objective wealth, in the form of capital , and that objective wealth becomes an alien power that now dominates the worker The worker creates the instrument of his or her own domination Through their labour, workers reproduce both capital and the labourerThe worker continually transforms his own product into a means by which another man can purchase him Marx elaborates thatproperty turns out to be the right, on the part of the capitalist, to appropriate the unpaid labour of others or its product, and the impossibility, on the part of the worker, of appropriating his own product In this way, the worker is alienated from his own labour and the product of his labour.Harvey describes the result as thatbourgeois freedoms and rights mask exploitation and alienationThe worker has been distorted intoa fragment of a man Against Neoliberal UtopianismHarvey draws a polemical, socio economic conclusion that is highly relevant to contemporary politicsAll the benefits from the pursuit of relative surplus value have accrued to the capitalist class to produce immense concentrations of wealth and surging inequalityIn Marx wordsAccumulation of wealth at one pole is, therefore, at the same time accumulation of misery, the torment of labour, slavery, ignorance, brutalisation and moral degradation at the opposite pole, i.e., on the side of the class that produces its own product as capitalIf this sounds like an exaggeration, Harvey respondsWhat Marx has done in Volume I of Capital is to take the words and theories of the classical political economists seriously and ask what kind of world would emerge if they got to implement their utopian liberal vision of perfectly functioning markets, personal liberty, private property rights and free tradeSignificant Diagnostic PowerTo this extent, as Harvey says,we can, I think, take insight though absolutely no comfort, and acquire significant diagnostic power, from a careful reading of Marx text and a deep appreciation of his methodIn effect, Marx can help us to deconstruct neoliberal utopianism.SOUNDTRACK view spoiler The Rolling Stones I Can t Get No Satisfaction Saints Know Your Product of Four Damaged Goods Reed Set the Twilight Reeling Reed Set the Twilight Reeling Live on Sessions on West 54th hide spoiler

  3. Chelsea Szendi says:

    Rather than watching hours of the videos of David Harvey s class on Capital online, we can now pick up this book Harvey is a great guide though Marx, especially through the very rough first sections Reading this book without reading Capital itself is better than not reading either, but I endorse Harvey s request that you really do read Marx in his own words Yes, that damned coat gets on the nerves, but Marx s writings are literature just irreducible to any interpretation.I love that Harvey Rather than watching hours of the videos of David Harvey s class on Capital online, we can now pick up this book Harvey is a great guide though Marx, especially through the very rough first sections Reading this book without reading Capital itself is better than not reading either, but I endorse Harvey s request that you really do read Marx in his own words Yes, that damned coat gets on the nerves, but Marx s writings are literature just irreducible to any interpretation.I love that Harvey has been devoting so much of his life to get people to read Marx, but hope that those who begin with Harvey also take Marx to new places and read Harvey s interpretations with a mind bent towards a ruthless criticism of everything existing

  4. Billie Pritchett says:

    Before digging into David Harvey s Companion to Marx s Capital, I wondered what insight Marx might have into the functioning of the economy I was pleasantly surprised to discover, at least on Harvey s account, what a seminal and important work Marx s Capital is, up there with Adam Smith s Wealth of Nations And in many respects, Marx s work complements Smith s work, Marx having read Smith extensively According to Harvey, the basic idea behind Marx s Capital, Volume I is that capitalist economi Before digging into David Harvey s Companion to Marx s Capital, I wondered what insight Marx might have into the functioning of the economy I was pleasantly surprised to discover, at least on Harvey s account, what a seminal and important work Marx s Capital is, up there with Adam Smith s Wealth of Nations And in many respects, Marx s work complements Smith s work, Marx having read Smith extensively According to Harvey, the basic idea behind Marx s Capital, Volume I is that capitalist economies, either left to their own devices or regulated, are subject to a host of instabilities that make crisesor less inevitable.Before getting into that claim, it s helpful to know what a capitalist economy is When you do, it isunderstandable why the crises occur Also, it becomes evident that what people tend to think a capitalist economy is is not what it is.Perhaps naively, I had the view that a capitalist economy was an economy that used some surrogate form of value, in our time paper money and debit credit cards, to allow the exchange of goods and services But in fact, that s not enough to call an economy capitalist A capitalist economy isabout a particular way in which this money to goods process is oriented.So here it is The goal of the capitalist economy is to grow the amount of the initial investment into some business or work intomoney You can think about it this way, by way of comparison to probably how you and I think of money You, I, and other ordinary people have a product our labor and we re willing to trade this labor for money so that we can buy goods and services for survival or leisure So the orientation of the money process for us is Product to Money to Product our work converted to money by our employers in order to obtain other products But a business owner s orientation and the orientation of an entire capitalist economy is different The money process is oriented like this Money to Product toMoney For the ownership, workers labor and the product that comes from the labor of the workers is just the means to an end to producemoney.But here s the problem A fundamental law of capitalist economies is that the initial money invested must always grow So every year, or in most cases every quarter, there must bemoney flowing through the business than there was previously But in actuality, growth isn t infinite For an owner, after the market is glutted with his or her product, when everything is at overcapacity, there have to be new creative ways to make money And all of those are used all the time.Here are some of those creative ways One creative way to allow for artificial growth is to cut workers salaries or to lay them off You do that, you don t have to pay them, and then your company makesmoney Another is that if you re an owner of a business and you have to compete with others who produce similar products, then you reduce your prices of your products to have a competitive advantage But at some point, you just can t get the prices any lower and make a profit So you produce the product at lower than the price that you can make money at, and then you borrow from big banks huge sums of money to offset the loss in the weakening of your product until you find some new way to increase your profits again, innovate your product, produce other products, and so on.Most of the large companies have in fact glutted the market with their products and are underselling their products and not making a profit But they declare the amount of money borrowed as profit This is all artificial growth Eventually, there s distrust in the market and then the owner has to pay back the loans but can t Then a financial collapse occurs And if enough companies are all operating in this way, then there could be a national or international crisis Look for another one soon This is Harvey s explanation of the relevance of Capital, Volume I It shows that when a capitalist economy is running according to the basic law of growing money, since it can t actually grow indefinitely, it creates artificial means to do so Then when the economy collapses, we all suffer And in our own time, our governments subsidize the failure of these major companies and we have to pay for that failure in taxes Strange setup

  5. Carlo says:

    David Harvey s Companion is a great way to read Marx s Capital Vol 1 The length of Capital may be intimidating, but if a reader travels book by book Harvey to Marx, Harvey to Marx, an appreciation of Marx s great critique will result Harvey moves the reader along, pointing out complexities of interpretation but not bogging down when he differs from other writers Harvey s goal is to read Marx with you, not to make a case for a perspective Pick up Harvey s Companion with the Vin David Harvey s Companion is a great way to read Marx s Capital Vol 1 The length of Capital may be intimidating, but if a reader travels book by book Harvey to Marx, Harvey to Marx, an appreciation of Marx s great critique will result Harvey moves the reader along, pointing out complexities of interpretation but not bogging down when he differs from other writers Harvey s goal is to read Marx with you, not to make a case for a perspective Pick up Harvey s Companion with the Vintage edition of Capital Vol 1 Post 2007 time to understand the world, time to change the world Time is now, begin here

  6. Peter (Pete) Mcloughlin says:

    Marx s Capital starts with foundational and elementary concepts, what is a commodity, What is the exchange value of a commodity, What is use value of a commodity, How is money used to exchange commodities, How is labor exchanged for money and commodities From these simple questions, we get an idea like the surplus value of labor ie I work a certain amount of hours the number of hours that go into making a commodity for an employer The employer if his business is working right will sell that Marx s Capital starts with foundational and elementary concepts, what is a commodity, What is the exchange value of a commodity, What is use value of a commodity, How is money used to exchange commodities, How is labor exchanged for money and commodities From these simple questions, we get an idea like the surplus value of labor ie I work a certain amount of hours the number of hours that go into making a commodity for an employer The employer if his business is working right will sell that commodity for a price higher than the cost of me making it So some of the hours I am paid for my labor my employer will break even The hours I work above and beyond this break, even the amount of pay is surplus value and the profit of my employer There is a conflict even in this simple formulation I don t like having to give too much surplus labor my employer would love to havesurplus labor that he can take from me because that adds to his profit From these beginnings, a whole edifice is created of Marxian economics It seems to hold up well at both the micro and macro level Marx in his work was studying Capitalism in his work And he showed that it has a lot of problems baked into its system and that it blows up in crises from time to time and would ultimately be untenable I agree it is built for crises but what comes after remains to be seen

  7. Quentin says:

    You should read Marx s Capital it s easier, funnier, and smarter than you think it will be, and you can gloss over some of the hard parts the first time through and still get the jist Harvey s companion is another route to go its based on his youtube able lecture series, and it works hard to explain some of Marx sarcane arguments, point out areas where he s unclear or incorrect, and tells you which parts you can skim if you just want to understand the arguments Harvey s tone is convers You should read Marx s Capital it s easier, funnier, and smarter than you think it will be, and you can gloss over some of the hard parts the first time through and still get the jist Harvey s companion is another route to go its based on his youtube able lecture series, and it works hard to explain some of Marx sarcane arguments, point out areas where he s unclear or incorrect, and tells you which parts you can skim if you just want to understand the arguments Harvey s tone is conversational, and he gives pretty fair time to some of the vociferous debates in Marxist theory

  8. Tyler says:

    A great recapitulation of the first volume of Capital for modern readers, written by a professor who taught the book for thirty years and who has his own intriguing ideas to add.

  9. tom bomp says:

    Very useful book to help demystify some of the stuff in Capital Volume 1 I disagree with quite a bit of what he says when he goes beyond Capital particularly the focus on neoliberalism but he connects it to Marx s work and seeing someone explicitly draw from it and developing it is useful Most helpful early on at parts it s limited to reiterating what Marx has said understandable because the first couple of parts are definitely the toughest so it s not too big a deal I do think he someti Very useful book to help demystify some of the stuff in Capital Volume 1 I disagree with quite a bit of what he says when he goes beyond Capital particularly the focus on neoliberalism but he connects it to Marx s work and seeing someone explicitly draw from it and developing it is useful Most helpful early on at parts it s limited to reiterating what Marx has said understandable because the first couple of parts are definitely the toughest so it s not too big a deal I do think he sometimes misses chances to argue a bit further The main example is the labour theory of value Marx didn t feel the need to justify it because it was commonly accepted at the time and Harvey only spends about a page I think doing so Given that it s such an important part of what follows, it would have been nice to have a bittime spent on it.Overall though, very handy guide and I recommend it as a guide to your own understanding and interpretation Couple of things David Harvey recommends the Penguin edition, which is probably the best available, if you re planning on following along, and it s the one he quotes from with page numbers However, the Penguin version comes with an appendix which is another chapter Marx wrote but didn t publish yet Harvey doesn t mention it at all It s no big deal, but it would have been nice just to say I m not covering the appendix somewhere

  10. Lori says:

    This book is absolutely brilliant Written in a crystal clear way, with deep insights into Karl Marx text, all the while letting the reader interpret Marx on his own terms David Harvey has done a fantastic job, and I wholeheartedly recommend this to anyone who wants to read Capital, Vol 1 A Critical Analysis of Capitalist Production.Not only does the author clarify, the sometimes, entangled arguments made by Marx, but also offers some relatable examples in contemporary times All the while ur This book is absolutely brilliant Written in a crystal clear way, with deep insights into Karl Marx text, all the while letting the reader interpret Marx on his own terms David Harvey has done a fantastic job, and I wholeheartedly recommend this to anyone who wants to read Capital, Vol 1 A Critical Analysis of Capitalist Production.Not only does the author clarify, the sometimes, entangled arguments made by Marx, but also offers some relatable examples in contemporary times All the while urging the reader to form their own opinions.I gave this book five stars, while I gave Capital only 4 The reason, of course, is Harvey s superior clarity in argumentation

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *