Herakles Book 2

Herakles Book 2 ❰Download❯ ➾ Herakles Book 2 Author Édouard Cour – Heartforum.co.uk Brimming with pathos and dark humor, this portrait of Herakles is a graphic whirlwind leaving little respite and often revealing beautiful surprises This second volume follows the titular hero on four Brimming with pathos and dark humor, this portrait of Herakles is a graphic whirlwind leaving little respite and often revealing beautiful surprises This second volume follows the titular hero on four of his epic quests, each one a steppingstone in his growth as both man and god.

Is a well known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the Herakles Book book, this is one of the most wanted Édouard Cour author readers around the world.

Herakles Book 2  Epub È Herakles Book  PDF \
  • Hardcover
  • 160 pages
  • Herakles Book 2
  • Édouard Cour
  • 10 February 2017
  • 9781942367505

10 thoughts on “Herakles Book 2

  1. Chad says:

    Herakles if he was the Hulk. He basically jumps from task to task finishing up the last of his 12 labours here with close to the same intelligence and vocabulary. The art is very simple, think Sam Keith if he just discovered black ink. Some of the panels continue to be so dark you have no idea what's in them. That bit is super freaking annoying. Overall it's not too shabby even if the 12 labours could have been more than just glossed over cliff notes versions of the stories.

    Received a review copy from Lion Forge and NetGalley. All thoughts are my own and in no way influenced by the aforementioned.

  2. Bruce says:

    This is a continuation of Herakles adventures from the first book. It is filled with action and some comedy, lots of gore and violence. But I also see continual patterns of repeated events, often not explained or put into a proper context. I think slowing down and giving a three-dimensional development would work better for the storyline.

  3. Theediscerning says:

    For some reason I didn't take to this volume quite as well as I did the first. In rounding up the last few labours of Hercules, and hinting at adventuring to come, it carries on the dynamically designed, flippant telling of his legend. Without his willy making an appearance, for a change. But I felt something was lacking. The comedic sense was much less here, the devil's advocate/spirit conscience plaguing him was annoying, and the stuff after the labours showed me why most stories end there. Plus some of the artwork is a little too out there – even if some of the adventures with scale are good, some don't work, and other scenes are quite impenetrable without research elsewhere. The giant flicking him across the countryside like a Subbuteo footballer is a good touch, but more like that was needed.

  4. Pop Bop says:

    A Stone Cold Hoot

    As far as I'm concerned Herakles/Heracles/Hercules is the original superhero. Almost four thousand years ago he was already the tormented, half-human, half-god, hero of dozens of bizarre and exciting stories. Clever, brutish, strong, sweet-tempered, just, unpredictable, frenzied, vengeful, and careless as only a Greek God could be careless, Hercules had everything but the cape and mask.

    This Book 2 covers his final four labors. (Retrieve the Belt of Hippolyta, Capture the Cattle of Geryon, Collect the Golden Apples, and Capture Cerberus). Most of them start off with some variation on the line - Finally! Something interesting to fight!. Most end with lots of wine. I just like a hero who comes across a maiden who's been staked out as a monster sacrifice, and says - Don't worry, little lady! You won't be dying today! I mean, unless that's what you want, of course.

    Is this a little flippant and casual for Greek myths? Sure. But while the Greek gods were taken seriously, they were also, and over time, sources of amusement, entertainment, and illumination. Taking a slightly cavalier approach, and introducing some banter and dry good humor, is a fine way to approach a character like Hercules. (I don't know if the casual colloquialisms are the author's or the translator's, but either way I approve.) And this has all of the angst, drama, and torment you could want. It's just scaled down perfectly to comic book superhero size. That's not an easy task, and I was constantly impressed by Cour's choices and approach. This telling has style and energy and attitude to spare, as well as a very sly and deadpan understanding of the Hercules cycle.

    This is all complemented by the artwork. It feels like ancient Greek art, but it has been made edgy and zaggier, with a sort of jazzy angular feel, (and a touch of Jules Feiffer, if you can believe it). That and the muted colors, (lots of different greens and yellows and browns), make much of the art look like it just jumped off some Greek vases. But it can sometimes trend toward the surreal, (as in Hades), though when it does so it does so with a purpose and it works.

    Should you be at least passingly familiar with the Hercules story in order to follow everything? Well, it wouldn't hurt; but it seems that if you're willing to miss a throwaway line here or there it isn't essential. (Anyway, ten minutes on Wikipedia will bring you up to speed nicely.) And in any event this is both an amusing and often gripping telling of the tale, and certainly left me with a renewed appreciation of Hercules, and of the fact that every superhero trope I can think of started here.

    (Please note that I received a free advance will-self-destruct-in-x-days Adobe Digital copy of this book without a review requirement, or any influence regarding review content should I choose to post a review. Apart from that I have no connection at all to either the author or the publisher of this book.)

  5. Pop Bop says:

    A Stone Cold Hoot

    As far as I'm concerned Herakles/Heracles/Hercules is the original superhero. Almost four thousand years ago he was already the tormented, half-human, half-god, hero of dozens of bizarre and exciting stories. Clever, brutish, strong, sweet-tempered, just, unpredictable, frenzied, vengeful, and careless as only a Greek God could be careless, Hercules had everything but the cape and mask.

    This Book 2 covers his final four labors. (Retrieve the Belt of Hippolyta, Capture the Cattle of Geryon, Collect the Golden Apples, and Capture Cerberus). Most of them start off with some variation on the line - Finally! Something interesting to fight!. Most end with lots of wine. I just like a hero who comes across a maiden who's been staked out as a monster sacrifice, and says - Don't worry, little lady! You won't be dying today! I mean, unless that's what you want, of course.

    Is this a little flippant and casual for Greek myths? Sure. But while the Greek gods were taken seriously, they were also, and over time, sources of amusement, entertainment, and illumination. Taking a slightly cavalier approach, and introducing some banter and dry good humor, is a fine way to approach a character like Hercules. (I don't know if the casual colloquialisms are the author's or the translator's, but either way I approve.) And this has all of the angst, drama, and torment you could want. It's just scaled down perfectly to comic book superhero size. That's not an easy task, and I was constantly impressed by Cour's choices and approach. This telling has style and energy and attitude to spare, as well as a very sly and deadpan understanding of the Hercules cycle.

    This is all complemented by the artwork. It feels like ancient Greek art, but it has been made edgy and zaggier, with a sort of jazzy angular feel, (and a touch of Jules Feiffer, if you can believe it). That and the muted colors, (lots of different greens and yellows and browns), make much of the art look like it just jumped off some Greek vases. But it can sometimes trend toward the surreal, (as in Hades), though when it does so it does so with a purpose and it works.

    Should you be at least passingly familiar with the Hercules story in order to follow everything? Well, it wouldn't hurt; but it seems that if you're willing to miss a throwaway line here or there it isn't essential. (Anyway, ten minutes on Wikipedia will bring you up to speed nicely.) And in any event this is both an amusing and often gripping telling of the tale, and certainly left me with a renewed appreciation of Hercules, and of the fact that every superhero trope I can think of started here.

    (Please note that I received a free advance will-self-destruct-in-x-days Adobe Digital copy of this book without a review requirement, or any influence regarding review content should I choose to post a review. Apart from that I have no connection at all to either the author or the publisher of this book.)

  6. Wayne McCoy says:

    'Herakles Book 2' by Edouard Cour brings the cranky Greek hero back in a second volume to complete his labors.

    Herakles is still questing, still plowing his way through problems, and still leaving a trail of enemies and allies in his wake. This time around he had to get the belt of Hippolyta, the Cattle of Geryon, some Apples of the Hesperides, and the three-headed dog Cerberus. He does it in the same gruff way that made me love the first volume. In the afterword, the various people and gods that Herakles encounters get short bios.

    What works is the simplicity of the whole thing. The art is simple as is the story, which makes this perfect and perfectly accessible. I think I liked the first volume a little bit better, but that may be because the earlier labors are a bit more known to me. I like this version of the character a lot who is blunt of wit and violence.

    I received a review copy of this graphic novel from Lion Forge, Diamond Book Distributors, and NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. Thank you for allowing me to review this graphic novel.

  7. The_Mad_Swede says:

    Picking up where the first volume left off, this one retells the story of Herakles' final four labours for King Eurystheus, and what happens after their completion. At the end of this, Édouard Cour truly starts to unveil the motivation of his flawed hero, and the potential tragedy of his fate.

    As stated in previously, I find Cour's retelling absolutely marvellous.

  8. Nick says:

    True Rating: 3.7 Stars

    I enjoyed this more than the first volume.

    In this volume, Herakles quests around the Mediterranean to fulfil his remaining Labours (Belt/Girdle of Hippolyta, Cattle of Geryon, Apples of the Hesperides, and Cerberus). Tome II also covers Herakles joining the Argonauts, and his slaying of Iphitos. Along the way he hilariously whistles, quips, effortlessly pummels the crap out of and dismissively thwacks those who challenge him.

    I love seeing a yellow, Simpsons-like Herakles drawn as this massive, impatient brute who hops around like a giant flea and flies into insane rages -- kind of like The Hulk. I like what Cour does here: he manages to capture the essence of the mythology, tell the story of Herakles with humour and yet also with dark and bloody tragedy, and he does it with short-but-sweet sentences and commendable graphic art.

    I do find the treatment is sometimes too abrupt, and the 'plot' of this tome is a bit jarring. For example, the violent tragedy with Hippolyta and The Amazons starts the volume, and I don't feel the reasons for the tragedy are properly explained or done justice with Cour's script or art. Likewise, Herakles' foray with Jason and The Argonauts is short and poorly-paced - even given the general time-constraints of the medium and accepted duration of Herakles' quest membership. Additionally, it's not always clear when Hera is 'present' in the story, the way dialogue is placed gets confusing and it's not always clear who's speaking, and the little voice of doubt / creature / personification of Hera who follows Herakles around is silly and an unsatisfying foil or comic foil at times. Finally, while someone who doesn't know the mythology of Herakles can still enjoy Cour's story, I don't feel Cour does a good enough job here for a neophyte to properly learn the mythology. Too much information is left out and too many creative editing decisions are taken.

    So, I guess I feel Herakles' story could be told better, but Herakles II presents it in a fantastic and creative way. Cour paints his vision of Herakles, and, although it is not altogether 'accurate' (based on our scant historical evidence of mythological history), it is a memorable one.

  9. J.D. DeHart says:

    Unfortunately, not all of the images came through in this download. What did come through was exciting and jarring. This book has a unique artistic style that makes it quite appealing. It has the makings of a fantastic and well done adventure.

  10. Molly says:

    I picked this up without realizing that it was Book 2 of the series, so I'm likely missing some context. It's based in Greek mythology, though, so it was easy enough to pick up some of the plot points around his quest - and the art was really unique and interesting. It was a pretty good read, but not really my kind of thing.

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