Dragon Fighter: One Woman's Epic Struggle for Peace with China

Dragon Fighter: One Woman's Epic Struggle for Peace with China❮Download❯ ➺ Dragon Fighter: One Woman's Epic Struggle for Peace with China ✤ Author Rebiya Kadeer – Heartforum.co.uk Along the ancient Silk Road where Europe, Asia, and Russia converge stands the four thousand year old homeland of a peaceful people, the Uyghurs Their culture is filled with music, dance, family, and Along the One Woman's PDF/EPUB ç ancient Silk Road where Europe, Asia, and Russia Dragon Fighter: ePUB × converge stands the four thousand year old homeland of a peaceful Fighter: One Woman's PDF Ê people, the Uyghurs Their culture is filled with music, dance, family, and love of tradition passed down by storytelling through the agesFor millennia, they have survived clashes in the shadow of China, Russia, and Central Asia Rebiya Kadeer s courage, intellect, morality, and sacrifice give hope to the nearly eleven million Uyghurs worldwide on whose behalf she speaks as an indomitable world leader for the freedom of her people and the sovereignty of her nationHer life story is one of legends as a refugee child, as a poor housewife, as a multimillionaire, as a high official in China s National People s Congress, as a political prisoner in solitary confinement for two of nearly six years in jail, and now as a political dissident living in Washington, DC, exiled from her own land.

Rebiya Kadeer One Woman's PDF/EPUB ç Uyghur is a prominent Uyghur businesswoman and political Dragon Fighter: ePUB × activist from the northwest region of Xinjiang in the People s Fighter: One Woman's PDF Ê Republic of China PRC , also known as East Turkestan She has been the president of the World Uyghur Congress since November Kadeer has been active in defending the rights of the largely Muslim Uyghur minority, who she says has been subject to systematic oppression by the Chinese governmentKadeer is currently living in exile in the United States.

Dragon Fighter: One Woman's Epic Struggle for Peace with
    Dragon Fighter: One Woman's Epic Struggle for Peace with and love of tradition passed down by storytelling through the agesFor millennia, they have survived clashes in the shadow of China, Russia, and Central Asia Rebiya Kadeer s courage, intellect, morality, and sacrifice give hope to the nearly eleven million Uyghurs worldwide on whose behalf she speaks as an indomitable world leader for the freedom of her people and the sovereignty of her nationHer life story is one of legends as a refugee child, as a poor housewife, as a multimillionaire, as a high official in China s National People s Congress, as a political prisoner in solitary confinement for two of nearly six years in jail, and now as a political dissident living in Washington, DC, exiled from her own land."/>
  • Hardcover
  • 426 pages
  • Dragon Fighter: One Woman's Epic Struggle for Peace with China
  • Rebiya Kadeer
  • English
  • 12 December 2018
  • 0979845610

10 thoughts on “Dragon Fighter: One Woman's Epic Struggle for Peace with China

  1. Sam says:

    Fantastic biography of an incredible woman.

  2. Daniel says:

    Rebiya Kadeer s biography offers an outstanding insider view on the history and life in Xinjiang East Turkestan Her story is very remarkable She started with almost nothing and managed to make a fortune with her businesses, first to support her children and later to help her people Remarkable, too, is how she always somehow managed to deal with corrupt officials, the Chinese state, but also everyday problems Kadeer has shun no risks to help the Uyghurs It s saddening that in the end, the C Rebiya Kadeer s biography offers an outstanding insider view on the history and life in Xinjiang East Turkestan Her story is very remarkable She started with almost nothing and managed to make a fortune with her businesses, first to support her children and later to help her people Remarkable, too, is how she always somehow managed to deal with corrupt officials, the Chinese state, but also everyday problems Kadeer has shun no risks to help the Uyghurs It s saddening that in the end, the Chinese authorities focused on her separatist orientation which was not translated in any separatist activities and tried to drive her into insanity in jail Interestingly, however, she was offered a very influential position just before that, which made me wonder whether she would have been able to help her peoplein this position Unfortunately, she and the author of the book did not reflect on this.I don t share the Chinese authorities position that she is a liar, but I m not quite convinced by some of her statements Generally, the book is quite anti Chinese not surprising if you consider her history and the common tendency of refugees to talk about their home countries in negative ways Sometimes, however, I think that this kind of orientation can result in questionable conclusions For example, she claims that officials were forced to continue to report record harvests during the Great Leap Forward The explanation I ve heard before and findplausible is that official had incentives to manipulate their data to improve their standing among superiors Another example is her view on urban planning traditional Uyghur buildings had to make place for modern Chinese ones Are these buildings really demolished because they are built according to Uyghur traditions as Kadeer implies or is it part of a larger modernisation process, in which old buildings are replaced by new ones common especially in rapidly developing countries In both examples, the book assumes unfair, anti Uyghur or simply evil tendencies, although there are alternative explanations.Not much information on the role and background knowledge of the author, Alexandra Cavelius, is provided The section on this at the end of the book should be much longer The author s knowledge of Rebiya Kadeer s life is based on interviews and I think it is important to know how this was transformed into this book withoutdetails on this, I have to assume that Cavelius might have improvised a bit.Despite these concerns, it is a great book, from which you can learn a lot about Xinjiang and China s policies towards it s larger minorities

  3. Mythili says:

    What China is deceitfully not revealing to the outside world is that it is so successful financially only because it does not play by the rules of justice A system without justice is a system without hope This is a discovery Rebiya Kadeer makes at an early age, growing up in the Uyghur nation known as Uyghurstan or East Turkestan and as the Xinjian Uyghur Autonomous Region to the Chinese , a swath of land north of Tibet bordered by Mongolia, Kazakstan, Kyrgzstan, Tajikistan, Pakistan and I What China is deceitfully not revealing to the outside world is that it is so successful financially only because it does not play by the rules of justice A system without justice is a system without hope This is a discovery Rebiya Kadeer makes at an early age, growing up in the Uyghur nation known as Uyghurstan or East Turkestan and as the Xinjian Uyghur Autonomous Region to the Chinese , a swath of land north of Tibet bordered by Mongolia, Kazakstan, Kyrgzstan, Tajikistan, Pakistan and India.When her family is thrown out of their home and her father is beaten, Kadeer s idyllic childhood comes to tumbling to an end Though still a young woman, she has a strong sense of civic duty and resolves to defend Uyghurs from the cultural robbery, ideological oppression, violence and tireless Communist indoctrination she sees steadily imposed by the Chinese by 1957, Kadeer writes, her feelings were clear I wanted to stop seeing posters of Chairman Mao s adipose face, with that forever grinning mouth, plastered over every wall Unfortunately, with time, the injustices imposed on Uyghurs only increase Kadeer charts the routine banishment, execution, forced flight, arrest, resettlement, and public humiliation of her Uyghur friends and neighbors She notes that their persecutors would even shoot the pet dogs of Uyghurs to make a point By age 28 Kadeer is a relocated and divorced mother of six Restless to provide for her children and take control of the future, she remakes herself as a businesswoman and begins unconventional courtship with an Uyghur activist named Sidik Rouzi With the security afforded by her business profits and her 2nd marriage, she returns her attention to political activism Although by the early 90s, the USSR has dissolved, freeing Kazaks, Uzbeks, Tajiks and Krykhiz, and Kadeer has become the wealthiest woman in China, the oppression of Uyghurs has not abated what s , it still remains largely unknown outside of the region Even after Kadeer wins a seat in China s National People s Congress, she is unable to counteract the effects of Chinese bureaucrats repopulating the Uyghur region with AIDs patients and botching relief works when the region is struck by an earthquake Ultimately, the efforts of Kadeer and her husband land her in prisoned for six harsh years.The remarkable resilience she demonstrates in the face of horrendous prison conditions typifies her dauntless, lifelong struggle This story of singular bravery is a compelling testament to the human spirit s obstinate right to freedom

  4. Deborah says:

    This autobiography is packed with insights on current human rights and freedom issues in China Rebiya Kadeer shares her experiences as a refugee child, self made multimillionaire, and later as a political dissident protesting human rights violations against the Uyghur people.

  5. Salih Uyghur says:

    Well the book is about the Life of Rebiya Kadeer an Uyghur politcal leader also known as the mother of Uyghurs. Rebiay Kadeer is a politcal and human rights activist for her people the Uyghurs of East Turkistan Northwest,China

  6. Mehmet Akif Koç says:

    in in de i ik ve g lgede kalan y z n daha iyi g rebilmek a s ndan okunabilir

  7. Bira Cadısı says:

    This book has been a true inspiration for me on how I look at the people around me and the world we live in.

  8. Melissa says:

    This was a surprise book that I found in a neighborhood book box, really glad I read it.

  9. Don says:

    Kadeer the figurehead leader of the Uighur people a Turkic ethnic group whose homeland is in the now named Xinjiang Uighur Autonomous Region of north west China It was first claimed by the Manchus in 1760 Their subsequent rule was unsteady owing to the resistance of the Uighurs and required military reoccupation on four occasions during the following century.The overthrow of the imperial Chinese state in 1911 and its replacement with a republic weakened Beijing s hold on the territory and fo Kadeer the figurehead leader of the Uighur people a Turkic ethnic group whose homeland is in the now named Xinjiang Uighur Autonomous Region of north west China It was first claimed by the Manchus in 1760 Their subsequent rule was unsteady owing to the resistance of the Uighurs and required military reoccupation on four occasions during the following century.The overthrow of the imperial Chinese state in 1911 and its replacement with a republic weakened Beijing s hold on the territory and for a brief periods a East Turkistan Republic was proclaimed by the Uighurs, Kazaks, and other Turkic groups in the region It did not flourish and by the 1940s the region became embroiled in the second world war, as the Soviets fell back into its territory under the initial impact of the Nazi attack on Russia.After the war the local Uighur leadership observed the rise and eventual victory of Mao s Communists They initially refused to acknowledge his rise to power In August 1949 a delegation of Uighur leaders was invited to participate in a session of the People s Congress in Beijing The plane they boarded crashed in the mountains of Manchuria and the momentum towards Uighur independence came to an end.Rebiya Kadeer was one year old when Mao declared East Turkistan part of China, on 1 October 1949 Her father was an enterprising businessmen who opened shops around the family s large home compound She was five years old when the first Han Chinese started arriving in her home city, first offering candy to the children, but then expropriating Uighur businesses and property The community was haranged by party slogans, and, at the instigation of Mao s call to criticise the intellectuals in the spring of 1957, split into pro and anti Beijing factions.Kadeer s account of these years is replete with descriptions of the homeliness of the Uighur hearth, with folk tales and honour binding the people to to courteous and peaceful life The Muslim religion was practised as an idiosyncratic mix, combining shamanism, Buddhism, Taoism, Christianity and other influences All of this was, she argues, shattered by the arrival of the Chinese.An early marriage to a persistent suitor with a position in a local bank placed Kadeer in an ambiguous position in the power structure Children arrived and these years were dominated by their needs But her husband took against her at some point, claiming his right to divorce and take control of the children But the disaster of being an abandoned wife fired Kadeer into the next stage of her life,as a trader who accumulated assets worth millions in a few short years From this pinnacle she set out on a Gandhian path which aimed for the restoration of an independent Uighur nation.She ought a new husband as a partner in this enterprise, and tracked down a local hero of the Uighur resistance who had served an eight year sentence in a Chinese prison They moved cities and Kadeer s business acumen raised their personal wealth to new heights But it was a precarious existence The corruption of the Chinese administration as well as the changing whims of the politics of the Communist party saw any number of sudden reversals of fortune, with millions worth of assets being confiscated without any regard for legal process.The book fails to give a proper account of why Kadeer was able to weave her quixotic way between the Chinese factions and the local Uighur henchmen during this period, giving only light sketches based on confrontations with regional party leaders and administrators By some unexplained route she found herself an appointed representative to the People s Congress the Chinese state s parliamentary organ She bravely uses this platform to criticise the policies of ethnic displacement in her homeland, but rather than suffering for this act of lese majesty, the Beijing leaders proclaim her an invaluable source of information which would allow them to correct the excesses their followers were perpetrating.At some point the tide turned against her and arrest and long term imprisonment beckoned The final section of the book is a grim account of the conditions in Chinese prisons, which hold 1.8 million souls across the territories controlled by the state Not content with the mere containment of supposed dangerous elements, the state aims to break them as human beings, permitting only the irredeemably demoralised and the insane to claim freedom at the end of their sentences.Kadeer had an international reputation as the leader of her people to assist her in avoiding the worst fates of the Chinese prison system Amnesty International took up her cause and her husband, in exile in the US, became in influential lobbyist in the Washington corridors of power.She wins her freedom and is allowed to join her husband and some of her children in the US From there she has continued to provide testimony about the state of the Uighur people under the Chinese regime Those of her children who have remained pay a heavy price for her intransigence, themselves suffering imprisonment and constant harassment.This book emerged from conversations with Alexandra Carvelius, who was responsible for the text In this form it has the shortcomings of lack of additional supporting evidence It relies on the moral force Kadeer s narrative to make the case about the suffering of the Uighur people Better this than nothing It stands as another clear statement of what life is like for the people s who live under the sway of the authoritarian Chinese system and prompts those of us in the wider world to consider what can be done to advance the cause of human rights As we move through the decades of the century ahead it is a task that will become everurgent

  10. Fatma says:

    I didn t know much about the Uyghurs in China before reading this book It makes me really sad and angry to know that such injustice exist in our world and that these human rights violations are notwidely known Everyone who is interested in Asia or human rights should read this book But this aside I can only give 3 5 stars for this book because I didn t like the writing style it did make reading the book quite hard.

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